Research

Ethanol production: a ‘drink-or-drive’ issue

Posted by on September 17, 2009

Federal requirements to increase the production of ethanol have developed into a “drink-or-drive” issue in the Midwest as a result of biofuel production’s impact on water supplies and water quality, says Joel Burken, professor of environmental engineering at Missouri S&T, in the May 1 issue of the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

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Another band of brothers

Posted by on September 17, 2009

Despite the stirring portrayal in Band of Brothers, Easy Company of the 101st Airborne Division was not the first to enter Adolf Hitler’s Berchtesgaden mountain retreat near the end of World War II, says military historian John C. McManus in his latest book.

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Country music, city roots

Posted by on September 17, 2009

A fan of country music since childhood, Patrick Huber, associate professor of history and political science, asserts in his latest book that the origins of the genre in the South lie not in rural communities as previously believed, but in cities and towns. His book, Linthead Stomp: The Creation of Country Music in the Piedmont […]

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The hunt for household hazards

Posted by on June 9, 2009

Many researchers believe the air inside your home can be more hazardous to your health than the smog and other environmental pollutants you are exposed to outside, says Jon McKinney, a junior in environmental engineering at Missouri S&T.

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Underwater wi-fi

Posted by on June 9, 2009

The same acoustic waves that dolphins and whales use to communicate when they’re thousands of miles apart can be used by humans to transmit information wirelessly, says Rosa Zheng, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at Missouri S&T.

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Uncovering a mobster’s human side

Posted by on June 9, 2009

He was a notorious mobster and killer, but Benjamin “Bugsy” Siegel was also an affectionate father and a charming ladies’ man, says Amanda Kamps, a senior in history at Missouri S&T.

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Saving the world with green slime

Posted by on March 12, 2009

Several glass containers filled with algae-stained water sit on a table in Paul Nam’s laboratory. Next to the big green bottles are two much smaller vials. One of the vials, labeled “biodiesel,” contains a mostly clear solution labeled “algae oil.”

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This is your grid on brains

Posted by on March 12, 2009

Using thousands of brain cells from laboratory rats, S&T researchers hope to design a more intelligent power grid. They envision a more flexible system that can respond to uncertainty and circumstances – much like the brain itself.

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Sensing something wrong with structures

Posted by on March 12, 2009

Using a newly patented sensor system, engineers will be able to measure structural damage to bridges and buildings following an earthquake.

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A free-wheeling solution to poverty

Posted by on November 29, 2008

Pearl millet, a hardy grain that is abundant in even the harshest regions of Africa and India, is a staple for many of the world’s poorest people. But removing the edible seed from the chaff is hard work. Traditional threshing techniques usually involve women pounding the plant with mortar and pestle.

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