A new kind of farmer’s market

While Congress ponders the merits of cap-and-trade legislation to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, companies nationwide are scrambling to figure out how to cash in on the process. But smaller family farms could become lost in the convoluted maze of carbon credit markets. That’s where the work of Sarah Seigfreid, EnvE’09, can help.


As part of a research project she completed while studying at Missouri S&T, Seigfreid outlined a seven-step approach to help small-farm owners better understand carbon credit markets, where companies can buy and sell credits earned for efforts to prevent the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Companies and individuals sell their credits through exchange markets such as the Chicago Climate Exchange. Farmers may earn carbon credits in a variety of ways, from capping methane-emitting lagoons to planting more trees or adjusting grazing techniques. “Carbon capture on a small farm is a financially attractive thing to do,” Seigfreid says.
Seigfreid, who describes her research as “carbon credits for the little guy,” worked with Joel Burken, professor of civil and environmental engineering, on the project through the university’s Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experience program. She now works for Peabody Energy at the company’s El Segundo and Lee Ranch coal mines in Grants, N.M.

Around the Puck

“Forged in Gold: Missouri S&T’s First 150 Years”

In the 1870s, Rolla seemed an unlikely location for a new college. There were only about 1,400 residents in a community with more saloons than houses of worship. There were no paved streets, sewers or water mains. To visitors, there seemed to be as many dogs, hogs, horses, ducks and geese as humans walking the dusty streets.

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By the numbers: Fall/Winter 2019

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Bringing clean water to South America

Assessing water quality, surveying mountaintop locations and building systems to catch rainwater — that’s how members of S&T’s chapter of Engineers Without Borders spent their summer break.

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Geothermal goals exceeded

After five years of operation, Missouri S&T’s geothermal energy system continues to outperform expectations. S&T facilities operations staff originally predicted the geothermal system would reduce campus water usage by over 10% — roughly 10 million gallons per year. The system, which went online in May 2014, cut actual water usage by 18 million to 20 […]

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What happens in Vegas…may appear in print

In his latest volume of Las Vegas lore, historian Larry Gragg says it was deliberate publicity strategies that changed the perception of Sin City from a regional tourist destination where one could legally gamble and access legalized prostitution just outside the city limits, to a family vacation spot filled with entertainment options and surrounded by […]

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