Investing in the future

(Illustration by Jake Otto)

People who give charitably do so because they are passionate about their cause. They believe in investing in the future. At Missouri S&T, that generosity — and your passion for S&T — is what keeps the university thriving for our students.

You — our alumni — believe in higher education. You believe in opportunity. You believe in the value of an S&T education. And you believe in the importance of science, technology, engineering and math to the future of our nation. You know Missouri S&T is a good investment and your generosity is shaping our future. During fiscal year 2012, you helped raise $10.6 million for your alma mater.

For many years, Missouri S&T has enjoyed a stronger alumni participation rate than the national average. Miners get great jobs, and they appreciate the advantages their education provided. Our alumni participation rate is a clear illustration of the loyalty and pride of a Rolla Miner. During fiscal year 2011–12, 17.1 percent of our alumni made gifts to Missouri S&T. Last year the national average at public colleges and universities was 9.4 percent.

As alumni, you are critical to our future success, which is why we have some changes planned to strengthen your Rolla connection. We want to make sure all of our donors know how much we appreciate them and that their money is being put to good use, regardless of the size of their gift. Every donor now gets a personalized thank-you note and we created an annual report on giving for our donors that will debut next month. We have also improved and expanded the annual stewardship reports we send to all endowment donors.

The Miner Alumni Association has developed a new strategic plan that focuses on building relationships with our younger alumni. We want to be relevant to Miners of all ages.

We are also working to improve the ways we connect with you in today’s mobile society. We are reaching out to you more frequently and in different ways through monthly email updates that provide news and information of interest to you. We want to hear what you think about our alumni and fundraising efforts. And of course, we welcome your input. Call or email Joan Nesbitt, vice chancellor for university advancement, at nesbittj@mst.edu or 573-578-7808, or Darlene Ramsay, executive director of alumni relations and advancement services, at ramsayd@mst.edu or 573-341-4584.

Around the Puck

Generous partners complete ACML fundraising

Thanks to an investment from the University of Missouri System, major gifts from industry partners and alumni support, S&T will break ground on the Advanced Construction and Materials Laboratory (ACML) on Oct. 12, during Homecoming weekend.

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Alumni help with sesquicentennial planning

Seven alumni, including three Miner Alumni Association board members, have been named to Missouri S&T’s sesquicentennial advisory committee. The group is made up of graduates, students, faculty, staff and community members who are involved in planning the university’s upcoming 150th anniversary celebration.

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Using big data to reduce childbirth risks

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, complications during pregnancy or childbirth affect more than 50,000 women annually, and about 700 of them die every year. Steve Corns, associate professor of engineering management and systems engineering, is working with researchers from Phelps County Regional Medical Center through the Ozarks Biomedical Initiative to reduce […]

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Bogan solves Benton mural mystery

Missouri State Capitol muralist Thomas Hart Benton wrote in his memoir about being called into then-Gov. Guy Park’s office and told that a prominent St. Louis politician objected to Benton’s portrayal of black people, especially depictions of slavery.

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Breaking bias

According to Jessica Cundiff, assistant professor of psychological science at S&T, women who consider careers in the physical sciences, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields are deterred by stereotypes that impose barriers on the recruitment, retention and advancement of women in STEM.

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