Teaching and learning

Many graduate students work at the university as lecturers or graduate teaching assistants. And, most get time to prepare and have a certain mentality or “game face” when heading into their classrooms. For Mariah Covington, teaching and learning sometimes blur together.

“I teach a morning class and go straight from there to my classes where I am a student, so it is always like a splash of cold water,” says Covington, a graduate student in technical communication. “Splitting time between teaching and being taught is sometimes a challenge, and a 10-minute break is not really enough some days.”

She doesn’t mind the contrast between the two, though. She spends her office hours talking to students or meeting with faculty about departmental information rather than studying.

“It seems like a cliché, but seeing the students I teach change and improve is such a big motivator to put up with any difficulties and keep doing what I do,” says Covington. “Though it is strange to be called ‘Ms. Covington’ by students who are only a year or two younger than I am!”

Covington is not writing a traditional research thesis for her master’s, but she continues hands-on learning as a research assistant on campus. She helps Katie Grantham, AE’01, MS AE’03, PhD ME’05, associate professor of engineering management and systems engineering, to document information and help migrate data as the campus changes learning management systems.

Covington hopes her degree and current documentation work will prepare her for future employment in whatever country or situation she ends up in.

“My husband is a part of the U.S. Army at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., but he could be relocated at any time, so my hope is this degree will give me a lot of flexibility wherever we end up. But we will hopefully stay in the Rolla area for a few more years,” Covington says. “My undergraduate degree is in biochemistry, but by earning a writing-intensive degree, I hope to find a career in science documentation or writing.”

Around the Puck

Q&A: Miners got game

What was the most memorable sports team during your time on campus? As part of his research for the S&T 150th history book, Larry Gragg, Curators’ Distinguished Teaching Professor emeritus of history and political science, asked you to share your memories. Here are a few of your answers.

[Read More...]

Honoring new academy members

In October, 12 alumni and friends were inducted into Missouri S&T academies. Academy membership recognizes careers of distinction and invites members to share their wisdom, influence and resources with faculty and students. Some academies hold induction ceremonies in the fall, others in the spring.

[Read More...]

Boosting cyber-physical security

A wide array of complex systems that rely on computers — from public water supply systems and electric grids to chemical plants and self-driving vehicles — increasingly come under not just digital but physical attacks. Bruce McMillin, professor and interim chair of computer science at Missouri S&T, is looking to change that by developing stronger safeguards […]

[Read More...]

MXene discovery could improve energy storage

In spite of their diminutive size, 2-D titanium carbide materials known as MXenes are “quite reactive” to water, a discovery S&T researchers say could have implications for energy storage and harvesting applications such as batteries, supercapacitors and beyond. Their findings were published in 2018 in the American Chemical Society journal Inorganic Chemistry.

[Read More...]

A faster charge for electric vehicles

One drawback of electric vehicles (EVs) is the time it takes to charge them. But what if you could plug in your EV and fully charge it as quickly as it takes to fill up a conventional car with gasoline? Missouri S&T researchers, in collaboration with three private companies, are working to make speedy charging […]

[Read More...]