Q&A: Why Rolla?

“Why did you choose to attend MSM-UMR-Missouri S&T?” Historian Larry Gragg, Curators’ Distinguished Teaching Professor of history and political science, posed this question to Miner alumni this past fall. Here are a few of your answers.

It was close to home and had a stellar reputation. Also, my high school trig and calculus teacher had a degree from there and talked it up, telling us we’d never make it there. I was, of course, driven to prove him wrong. He may have been recruiting with reverse psychology.

Lori (Bartlett) Davis, CSci’83
Ballwin, Mo.


Great engineering program and when I took my first tour, it felt like home! I wanted to be surrounded by other people who were eager to learn, grow and be challenged.

Lacey Reames, CE’12
Belleville, Ill.


I chose to attend UMR (now Missouri S&T) in 1997 because it was (and still is) the most challenging and prestigious public university in Missouri.

Cori (Lock) Nelson, MgtSys’02
Leawood, Kan.


During a sixth-grade math competition, my teacher said I should consider being an engineer. I was crushed, wondering why he thought I should drive a train! I shrugged it off until career day with the microfiche. At the time I thought that making $60K a year I would buy a Jaguar XJS.

Bart Shivers, EE’92, MS EMgt’98
Wylie, Texas


I attended an eight-week National Science Foundation program at Rolla during the summer of 1960. One of our classes was taught by Dr. Ed Lorey, professor emeritus of ceramic engineering. He was a great teacher who convinced me that ceramic engineering was the field for me. Plus, I loved the campus. I applied for admission that fall, entered in the fall of 1961 and stayed all the way through a Ph.D. in 1968. Attending Rolla (MSM in those days) was the best decision I ever made.

James E. Shelby, CerE’65, MS CerE’66, PhD CerE’68
Bridgewater, N.J.


I was invited to attend a youth dinner hosted by various faculty when I was in sixth grade. The focus was on getting more children engaged in STEM earlier. Following that dinner I was hooked. Took multiple drafting and CAD classes in high school and went on to UMR. I own my own engineering consulting business now.

Tim Peters, AE’10
Derby, Kan.


Legacy — I’m third generation, No. 14, if I counted right, in my family to attend. I knew I wanted engineering, and obviously my family knows where to go.

Brian Sandhaus, MinE’09
York, Pa.


ROI. Period. End of story.

Joshua Young, CE’08, ArchE’08
St. Louis

Around the Puck

Seeking TBI therapies

By Delia Croessmann, croessmannd@mst.edu Complications from TBI can be life altering. They include post-traumatic seizures and hydrocephalus, as well as serious cognitive and psychological impairments, and the search for treatments to mitigate these neurodegenerative processes is on.

[Read More...]

Understanding the invisible injury

Students advance traumatic brain injury research By Sarah Potter, sarah.potter@mst.edu “Research is creating new knowledge.”–Neil Armstrong  Research keeps professors on the vanguard of knowledge in their fields and allows students to gain a deeper understanding of their area of study. For students and recent graduates researching traumatic brain injury (TBI) at Missouri S&T, the work […]

[Read More...]

Analyzing small molecules for big results

By Delia Croessmann, croessmannd@mst.edu At only 28 years old, Casey Burton, Chem’13, PhD Chem’17, director of medical research at Phelps Health in Rolla and an adjunct professor of chemistry at Missouri S&T, is poised to become a prodigious bioanalytical researcher.

[Read More...]

To prevent and protect

By Peter Ehrhard, ehrhardp@mst.edu Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are an unfortunate but all too common occurrence during military training and deployment. Because mild TBIs often present no obvious signs of head trauma or facial lacerations, they are the most difficult to diagnose at the time of the injury, and patients often perceive the impact as […]

[Read More...]

Q&A

Toughest class … ever Some of your classes may have been a breeze, but others kept you up at all hours studying, and some of you struggled just to pass. As part of his research for the S&T 150th anniversary history book, Larry Gragg , Curators’ Distinguished Teaching Professor emeritus of history and political science, asked […]

[Read More...]