Q&A: Why Rolla?

“Why did you choose to attend MSM-UMR-Missouri S&T?” Historian Larry Gragg, Curators’ Distinguished Teaching Professor of history and political science, posed this question to Miner alumni this past fall. Here are a few of your answers.

It was close to home and had a stellar reputation. Also, my high school trig and calculus teacher had a degree from there and talked it up, telling us we’d never make it there. I was, of course, driven to prove him wrong. He may have been recruiting with reverse psychology.

Lori (Bartlett) Davis, CSci’83
Ballwin, Mo.


Great engineering program and when I took my first tour, it felt like home! I wanted to be surrounded by other people who were eager to learn, grow and be challenged.

Lacey Reames, CE’12
Belleville, Ill.


I chose to attend UMR (now Missouri S&T) in 1997 because it was (and still is) the most challenging and prestigious public university in Missouri.

Cori (Lock) Nelson, MgtSys’02
Leawood, Kan.


During a sixth-grade math competition, my teacher said I should consider being an engineer. I was crushed, wondering why he thought I should drive a train! I shrugged it off until career day with the microfiche. At the time I thought that making $60K a year I would buy a Jaguar XJS.

Bart Shivers, EE’92, MS EMgt’98
Wylie, Texas


I attended an eight-week National Science Foundation program at Rolla during the summer of 1960. One of our classes was taught by Dr. Ed Lorey, professor emeritus of ceramic engineering. He was a great teacher who convinced me that ceramic engineering was the field for me. Plus, I loved the campus. I applied for admission that fall, entered in the fall of 1961 and stayed all the way through a Ph.D. in 1968. Attending Rolla (MSM in those days) was the best decision I ever made.

James E. Shelby, CerE’65, MS CerE’66, PhD CerE’68
Bridgewater, N.J.


I was invited to attend a youth dinner hosted by various faculty when I was in sixth grade. The focus was on getting more children engaged in STEM earlier. Following that dinner I was hooked. Took multiple drafting and CAD classes in high school and went on to UMR. I own my own engineering consulting business now.

Tim Peters, AE’10
Derby, Kan.


Legacy — I’m third generation, No. 14, if I counted right, in my family to attend. I knew I wanted engineering, and obviously my family knows where to go.

Brian Sandhaus, MinE’09
York, Pa.


ROI. Period. End of story.

Joshua Young, CE’08, ArchE’08
St. Louis

Around the Puck

Q&A: Miners got game

What was the most memorable sports team during your time on campus? As part of his research for the S&T 150th history book, Larry Gragg, Curators’ Distinguished Teaching Professor emeritus of history and political science, asked you to share your memories. Here are a few of your answers.

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Honoring new academy members

In October, 12 alumni and friends were inducted into Missouri S&T academies. Academy membership recognizes careers of distinction and invites members to share their wisdom, influence and resources with faculty and students. Some academies hold induction ceremonies in the fall, others in the spring.

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Boosting cyber-physical security

A wide array of complex systems that rely on computers — from public water supply systems and electric grids to chemical plants and self-driving vehicles — increasingly come under not just digital but physical attacks. Bruce McMillin, professor and interim chair of computer science at Missouri S&T, is looking to change that by developing stronger safeguards […]

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MXene discovery could improve energy storage

In spite of their diminutive size, 2-D titanium carbide materials known as MXenes are “quite reactive” to water, a discovery S&T researchers say could have implications for energy storage and harvesting applications such as batteries, supercapacitors and beyond. Their findings were published in 2018 in the American Chemical Society journal Inorganic Chemistry.

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A faster charge for electric vehicles

One drawback of electric vehicles (EVs) is the time it takes to charge them. But what if you could plug in your EV and fully charge it as quickly as it takes to fill up a conventional car with gasoline? Missouri S&T researchers, in collaboration with three private companies, are working to make speedy charging […]

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