With a (lotta) help … from our friends

It takes many hands to make light work and to create a community of support for S&T students and alumni. Without the help of volunteers, mailings wouldn’t be as prompt; events wouldn’t run as smoothly (there’d also be no one to show visitors the way to the facilities at commencement). These individuals enrich the university experience for students and staff. It really couldn’t be done without them. The following standouts spend many hours helping the association, bringing along a wealth of knowledge and experience:

Left to right: Dixie Finley, Nancy and Don Brackhahn, Chuck Remington and Charlie Hell. (Photo by B.A. Rupert)

  • Chuck Remington, ME’49, MS ME’50, retired in 1989 as a longtime mechanical engineering professor at S&T. He and his late wife, Agnes, began volunteering shortly after his retirement. Remington enjoys livening up the typically quiet office, especially on Tuesdays when he just might bring brownies from the “pie lady” at the farmer’s market. His is a familiar face, and voice, to many. Elaine Russell, external relations manager, tells of a recent campus visit by an alumnus and his family. “Jeff Buck, ME’77, was here from Houston and he recognized his former professor, Chuck, by his voice,” she says. “Everyone seems to know him.”
  • Charlie Hell, a volunteer for more than 11 years, is the son of the late John “Pat” Hell, MinE’33. He left his hometown of Rolla to work at AT&T in St. Louis, then retired to Florida. Hell returned to Rolla after 45 years and says former high school classmate, John Smith, CE’51, got him involved with the alumni office. Remington and Hell are popular with the students. At the senior pizza party, Stacy Jones, internal relations manager, often hears from students “those older guys at the registration table are so much fun.”
  • Dixie Finley, Psyc’68, widow of Charles B. Finley, former head football coach at S&T, is the newest alumni office volunteer. She retired after 25 years as a counselor for Rolla schools and now enjoys working with the alumni staff and volunteers. “The people are friendly, helpful, gracious and very appreciative,” she says.
  • Don and Nancy Brackhahn volunteer around campus and the community. Don retired in 2002 after 17 years as director of alumni affairs and constituent relations at S&T. “We’ve developed great friendships with alumni here over the years,” says Don. “We want to give back some of what we’ve received from the university and the community.” The Brackhahns attend Homecoming and other events, and as many Miner sporting events as they can. Nancy served as president of the Miner Booster Club for six years and continues as a member of its board. “It helps us keep in touch with alums and friends,” she says.

Around the Puck

Q&A: Miners got game

What was the most memorable sports team during your time on campus? As part of his research for the S&T 150th history book, Larry Gragg, Curators’ Distinguished Teaching Professor emeritus of history and political science, asked you to share your memories. Here are a few of your answers.

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Honoring new academy members

In October, 12 alumni and friends were inducted into Missouri S&T academies. Academy membership recognizes careers of distinction and invites members to share their wisdom, influence and resources with faculty and students. Some academies hold induction ceremonies in the fall, others in the spring.

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Boosting cyber-physical security

A wide array of complex systems that rely on computers — from public water supply systems and electric grids to chemical plants and self-driving vehicles — increasingly come under not just digital but physical attacks. Bruce McMillin, professor and interim chair of computer science at Missouri S&T, is looking to change that by developing stronger safeguards […]

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MXene discovery could improve energy storage

In spite of their diminutive size, 2-D titanium carbide materials known as MXenes are “quite reactive” to water, a discovery S&T researchers say could have implications for energy storage and harvesting applications such as batteries, supercapacitors and beyond. Their findings were published in 2018 in the American Chemical Society journal Inorganic Chemistry.

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A faster charge for electric vehicles

One drawback of electric vehicles (EVs) is the time it takes to charge them. But what if you could plug in your EV and fully charge it as quickly as it takes to fill up a conventional car with gasoline? Missouri S&T researchers, in collaboration with three private companies, are working to make speedy charging […]

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