Preston Carney: more than an OK (section) volunteer

Like many other alumni, Preston Carney, CE’02, MS CE’03, realizes that his success is due in large part to the quality education he received from Missouri S&T. And he hopes that his support ensures future students are given the same opportunities he had as a student.

Preston Carney (left) with a few S&T student ambassadors in the atrium of Butler-Carlton Civil Engineering Hall. (Photo by B.A. Rupert)

Carney gives financially to the university – he joined the Order of the Golden Shillelagh donor society while he was a graduate student at Missouri S&T – but for him, support is more than writing a check.
“Being a volunteer means a chance to give something back to the university. I was fortunate enough to benefit from the support of others as a student. Now it is my turn to do something in return,” he says. “While the financial support that alumni provide to the university is very important, there is also a lot to be gained by the donation of a little time.”

“The activities that sections offer help keep alumni engaged in the current state of the university.”

But for this Wallace Engineering structural engineer, a donation of a “little time” is an understatement.
Carney’s diverse volunteer experience includes being a member of the OGS Executive Committee and president of the Miner Alumni Association’s Oklahoma Section.
“Being a section officer allows me to associate with fellow alumni in the area,” explains Carney. “The activities that sections offer help keep alumni engaged in the current state of the university.”
Carney is also involved as an Alumni Admissions Ambassador, attending college fairs for high school students in his local area of Tulsa, Okla.
“These events allow me to encourage high school students to explore the field of engineering,” says Carney, a former member of the Steel Bridge Team. “And more specifically, the unique opportunities that Missouri S&T offers, from its quality education to the vast number of student design teams.”
With numerous volunteer hours already logged, luckily for Missouri S&T, there doesn’t seem to be an end in sight. “Although I do not know of a specific area (to volunteer for next) at this time, I am sure there is one out there,” explains Carney. “Knowing that today’s students benefit from our efforts is the driving force.”
Carney credits other alumni volunteers as his inspiration for continuing his support. “If we all do our part, we will continue to have a successful and involved alumni association to support this great university.”

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