Meet the new Miner Alumni Association president: Perrin Roller

This fall, Perrin Roller, GeoE’80, became president of the Miner Alumni Association. Missouri S&T Magazine staff sat down with the vice president of well engineering for Devon Energy to get his perspective about the job.


What do you feel is the most important role of the Miner Alumni Association?
Scott Peel

Perrin Roller

One of the most important roles of the Miner Alumni Association is to provide a huge, working network for the graduates of this university. This is important
because it provides a communications link with the university to keep alumni association members aware of and involved in all of the current happenings; it helps our members with career networking in their industries; it provides an avenue to provide financial, leadership and recruiting support; and helps keep you in touch with your friends and classmates.
What is your role as president?
I am more of a team leader and facilitator. Along with the other members of the Executive Committee and with the tremendous help and support of the alumni
and development offices on campus, we control the rudder of the ship, so to speak,
and continue to steer it in the proper direction.
We have a long tradition of high-caliber individuals who have served as president
and now continue to serve as past presidents, advising the board. We also have
a great tradition of support from those that have volunteered their time to the board and as section leaders and officers.
What are your plans for your term?
Increase the networking with and among the members of the alumni association. Increase the participation rate of association members. Build upon the existing support for the university both from individuals and from corporations.
What challenges do you see facing the alumni association in the coming years?
I see three main challenges. Obviously we are concerned with fundraising due to
the economy and the financial markets.
Recruiting is also important. With the declining number of students in Missouri, we must begin recruiting more students nationally. I also think the alumni association, along with the university, is in a unique position to help develop new ideas for energy and move them forward, considering the number of alumni in the energy business in some form or fashion.
As a graduate of Missouri S&T, how do you feel the university prepared you for
your success?

One of the keys to success was the development of my critical thinking skills. S&T graduates have always had a reputation of being very good problem solvers. This is
a big advantage in any industry.
If you could give advice to a new graduate, what would you say?
Broaden your horizons and think globally. Realize we are in a global economy and there are numerous opportunities for you as a Missouri S&T graduate around the world. Don’t be afraid to pursue your dreams.

Around the Puck

“Forged in Gold: Missouri S&T’s First 150 Years”

In the 1870s, Rolla seemed an unlikely location for a new college. There were only about 1,400 residents in a community with more saloons than houses of worship. There were no paved streets, sewers or water mains. To visitors, there seemed to be as many dogs, hogs, horses, ducks and geese as humans walking the dusty streets.

[Read More...]

By the numbers: Fall/Winter 2019

[Read More...]

Bringing clean water to South America

Assessing water quality, surveying mountaintop locations and building systems to catch rainwater — that’s how members of S&T’s chapter of Engineers Without Borders spent their summer break.

[Read More...]

Geothermal goals exceeded

After five years of operation, Missouri S&T’s geothermal energy system continues to outperform expectations. S&T facilities operations staff originally predicted the geothermal system would reduce campus water usage by over 10% — roughly 10 million gallons per year. The system, which went online in May 2014, cut actual water usage by 18 million to 20 […]

[Read More...]

What happens in Vegas…may appear in print

In his latest volume of Las Vegas lore, historian Larry Gragg says it was deliberate publicity strategies that changed the perception of Sin City from a regional tourist destination where one could legally gamble and access legalized prostitution just outside the city limits, to a family vacation spot filled with entertainment options and surrounded by […]

[Read More...]