Meet the new Miner Alumni Association president: Perrin Roller

This fall, Perrin Roller, GeoE’80, became president of the Miner Alumni Association. Missouri S&T Magazine staff sat down with the vice president of well engineering for Devon Energy to get his perspective about the job.


What do you feel is the most important role of the Miner Alumni Association?
Scott Peel

Perrin Roller

One of the most important roles of the Miner Alumni Association is to provide a huge, working network for the graduates of this university. This is important
because it provides a communications link with the university to keep alumni association members aware of and involved in all of the current happenings; it helps our members with career networking in their industries; it provides an avenue to provide financial, leadership and recruiting support; and helps keep you in touch with your friends and classmates.
What is your role as president?
I am more of a team leader and facilitator. Along with the other members of the Executive Committee and with the tremendous help and support of the alumni
and development offices on campus, we control the rudder of the ship, so to speak,
and continue to steer it in the proper direction.
We have a long tradition of high-caliber individuals who have served as president
and now continue to serve as past presidents, advising the board. We also have
a great tradition of support from those that have volunteered their time to the board and as section leaders and officers.
What are your plans for your term?
Increase the networking with and among the members of the alumni association. Increase the participation rate of association members. Build upon the existing support for the university both from individuals and from corporations.
What challenges do you see facing the alumni association in the coming years?
I see three main challenges. Obviously we are concerned with fundraising due to
the economy and the financial markets.
Recruiting is also important. With the declining number of students in Missouri, we must begin recruiting more students nationally. I also think the alumni association, along with the university, is in a unique position to help develop new ideas for energy and move them forward, considering the number of alumni in the energy business in some form or fashion.
As a graduate of Missouri S&T, how do you feel the university prepared you for
your success?

One of the keys to success was the development of my critical thinking skills. S&T graduates have always had a reputation of being very good problem solvers. This is
a big advantage in any industry.
If you could give advice to a new graduate, what would you say?
Broaden your horizons and think globally. Realize we are in a global economy and there are numerous opportunities for you as a Missouri S&T graduate around the world. Don’t be afraid to pursue your dreams.

Around the Puck

Seeking TBI therapies

By Delia Croessmann, croessmannd@mst.edu Complications from TBI can be life altering. They include post-traumatic seizures and hydrocephalus, as well as serious cognitive and psychological impairments, and the search for treatments to mitigate these neurodegenerative processes is on.

[Read More...]

Understanding the invisible injury

Students advance traumatic brain injury research By Sarah Potter, sarah.potter@mst.edu “Research is creating new knowledge.”–Neil Armstrong  Research keeps professors on the vanguard of knowledge in their fields and allows students to gain a deeper understanding of their area of study. For students and recent graduates researching traumatic brain injury (TBI) at Missouri S&T, the work […]

[Read More...]

Analyzing small molecules for big results

By Delia Croessmann, croessmannd@mst.edu At only 28 years old, Casey Burton, Chem’13, PhD Chem’17, director of medical research at Phelps Health in Rolla and an adjunct professor of chemistry at Missouri S&T, is poised to become a prodigious bioanalytical researcher.

[Read More...]

To prevent and protect

By Peter Ehrhard, ehrhardp@mst.edu Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are an unfortunate but all too common occurrence during military training and deployment. Because mild TBIs often present no obvious signs of head trauma or facial lacerations, they are the most difficult to diagnose at the time of the injury, and patients often perceive the impact as […]

[Read More...]

Q&A

Toughest class … ever Some of your classes may have been a breeze, but others kept you up at all hours studying, and some of you struggled just to pass. As part of his research for the S&T 150th anniversary history book, Larry Gragg , Curators’ Distinguished Teaching Professor emeritus of history and political science, asked […]

[Read More...]