UMR student selected to meet Nobel winners

UMR graduate student Steven Jung is spending Independence Day with a group of Nobel Prize winners. Jung was selected to participate in the 2007 Meeting of Nobel Laureates and Students in Lindau, Germany.


About 500 students from around the world have been invited to the meeting, which will be held July 1-6. Each year, Nobel Laureates in chemistry, physics, physiology and medicine convene in Lindau to give lectures and meet informally with students and young researchers.
The Laureates lecture on topics of their choice in the mornings and have informal discussions with small groups of students during the afternoons and evenings.
Jung, a graduate student in ceramic engineering, was nominated by the Savannah River National Lab in Aiken, S.C. He worked at the lab last summer as an intern. This summer he’s beginning work on his Ph.D. at UMR.
At UMR, Jung is conducting research with Delbert Day, Curators’ Professor emeritus of ceramic engineering.
Day is internationally known for finding new applications for glass. Among other inventions, he developed tiny radioactive glass beads called Theraspheres that can be injected directly into cancerous areas of the body.
Jung is working with glass materials to build medical scaffolding for use in the regeneration of bone tissue. He is also interested in using glass materials as a method to help contain nuclear waste.
The U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation are among the organizations that help pay for students to attend the annual event.

Around the Puck

“Forged in Gold: Missouri S&T’s First 150 Years”

In the 1870s, Rolla seemed an unlikely location for a new college. There were only about 1,400 residents in a community with more saloons than houses of worship. There were no paved streets, sewers or water mains. To visitors, there seemed to be as many dogs, hogs, horses, ducks and geese as humans walking the dusty streets.

[Read More...]

By the numbers: Fall/Winter 2019

[Read More...]

Bringing clean water to South America

Assessing water quality, surveying mountaintop locations and building systems to catch rainwater — that’s how members of S&T’s chapter of Engineers Without Borders spent their summer break.

[Read More...]

Geothermal goals exceeded

After five years of operation, Missouri S&T’s geothermal energy system continues to outperform expectations. S&T facilities operations staff originally predicted the geothermal system would reduce campus water usage by over 10% — roughly 10 million gallons per year. The system, which went online in May 2014, cut actual water usage by 18 million to 20 […]

[Read More...]

What happens in Vegas…may appear in print

In his latest volume of Las Vegas lore, historian Larry Gragg says it was deliberate publicity strategies that changed the perception of Sin City from a regional tourist destination where one could legally gamble and access legalized prostitution just outside the city limits, to a family vacation spot filled with entertainment options and surrounded by […]

[Read More...]