Authors among us

America’s war on drugs examined in 19th century
Today’s war on drugs is not the first battle America has fought against addiction. In her new book, The Opium Debate and Chinese Exclusion Laws, UMR historian Diana Ahmad examines the opium-smoking epidemic of the mid-19th century and finds that Chinese immigrants weren’t the problem, as is commonly believed.


Published in March by the University of Nevada Press, the book explains that while China faced its own epidemic of opium addiction in the 19th century, only a very small minority of Chinese immigrants in America were actually involved in the opium business.
Kohser co-authors engineering textbook
Ronald Kohser, professor of metallurgical engineering, is co-author of the recently published 10th edition of Materials and Processes in Manufacturing. This marks the 50th anniversary of the textbook, originally written by a University of California-Berkeley professor in 1957.
Kohser became a contributing author during the writing of the fifth edition and has been a full co-author since the publication of the sixth edition. UMR students use the text for core courses in mechanical and metallurgical engineering.

Neural networking explained in new book
Jagannathan Sarangapani, professor of electrical and computer engineering since 2001, is the author of Neural Network Control of Nonlinear Discrete-Time Systems, recently published by Taylor and Francis (or CRC Press).
Loosely based on the inner workings of the human brain, a neural network is used in computational science to study and analyze complex phenomena. Sarangapani’s book presents modern control techniques, which he bases on the parallelism and adaptive capabilities of biological nervous systems.
Sarangapani has invented several neural network-based techniques to diagnose engine problems.

Around the Puck

“Forged in Gold: Missouri S&T’s First 150 Years”

In the 1870s, Rolla seemed an unlikely location for a new college. There were only about 1,400 residents in a community with more saloons than houses of worship. There were no paved streets, sewers or water mains. To visitors, there seemed to be as many dogs, hogs, horses, ducks and geese as humans walking the dusty streets.

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By the numbers: Fall/Winter 2019

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Bringing clean water to South America

Assessing water quality, surveying mountaintop locations and building systems to catch rainwater — that’s how members of S&T’s chapter of Engineers Without Borders spent their summer break.

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Geothermal goals exceeded

After five years of operation, Missouri S&T’s geothermal energy system continues to outperform expectations. S&T facilities operations staff originally predicted the geothermal system would reduce campus water usage by over 10% — roughly 10 million gallons per year. The system, which went online in May 2014, cut actual water usage by 18 million to 20 […]

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What happens in Vegas…may appear in print

In his latest volume of Las Vegas lore, historian Larry Gragg says it was deliberate publicity strategies that changed the perception of Sin City from a regional tourist destination where one could legally gamble and access legalized prostitution just outside the city limits, to a family vacation spot filled with entertainment options and surrounded by […]

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