A crime to remember

Posted by
On August 3, 2020

Trent brown poses in a suit with his typewriter in his office.

Trent Brown a professor of English at S&T, chronicles the first comprehensive examination of the case in his book Murder in McComb: The Tina Andrews Case.

Mississippi native Trent Brown was born in McComb, a town of 10,000 he calls “a remarkably violent place in the 1960s.” It’s also where a 12-year-old named Tina Andrews was murdered in 1969. After two extensive murder trials that ended in a mistrial in 1971 and resulted in an acquittal in 1972, her case remains unsolved today.

Brown, a professor of English at S&T, chronicles the first comprehensive examination of the case in his book Murder in McComb: The Tina Andrews Case. After three years of research and writing, his investigation sheds new light on the impact of the prejudices of whites against whites during and after the tense, uncertain civil rights era.

Brown presents documented evidence and proceedings of the case, as well as recent interviews with people involved. He says the book doesn’t try to solve a cold case, but to explain why the arrests after the murder didn’t result in a conviction.

Andrews and her friend, Billie Jo Lambert, the state’s key witness, were considered “girls of ill repute” and “trashy” children by many people in McComb.

“If they had come from so-called ‘better’ families, I can imagine a different outcome for the case.”

“If they had come from so-called ‘better’ families, I can imagine a different outcome for the case,” he says. “With witnesses reluctant to testify, a skilled and aggressive defense attorney, and some local residents who didn’t wish to see the two arrested law enforcement officers convicted, the story became one about social class and taking sides.

“I’ve spent a lot of time reflecting on the values of the place where I grew up,” says Brown. “With Tina Andrews’ story, I’ve tried to explore part of the Deep South’s history in the years beyond the civil rights movement, and at the same time, give her short life and the lack of justice that ensued the recognition it deserves.”

mm
Posted by

On August 3, 2020. Posted in 2020, Around the Puck, Faculty, News, Profiles, Summer 2020

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 

Recent Posts

Celebrating 150 Years

Celebrating 150 Years

From hardscrabble, “country academy” roots, how we became a global research university Rolla in [...]
Innovation, the Rolla way

Innovation, the Rolla way

Since our founding, S&T and innovation have been tightly connected. From advances in materials,[...]
Keeping history alive

Keeping history alive

Several authors have written history books about S&T, but no tome can contain all the informati[...]
New book chronicles university's history

New book chronicles university's history

Larry Gragg, Curators’ Distinguished Teaching Professor emeritus of history and political science, [...]
What lies ahead for S&T's next 150 years?

What lies ahead for S&T's next 150 years?

 As Missouri S&T launches its 150th anniversary celebration, the world continues to recove[...]