Miners just want to have fun

One chapter of the S&T sesquicentennial history book will focus on pranks and scandals. As part of his research for that chapter, Larry Gragg, Curators’ Distinguished Teaching Professor emeritus of history and political science, asked you to share your stories. Here are just a couple of them.

My freshman year, several of my dorm friends and I had a water balloon fight outside our RA’s room.

She only came out to tell us to stop when she heard one explode on her door. Oh yeah, the balloons were water‑filled condoms. A year or two later, my roommates and I got really into interior decoration using items found around campus. Some of these items included “wet floor” signs from various buildings, traffic cones with Missouri S&T painted on them and orange construction fence. Prior to graduating, I returned all items except for a hot pink wet floor sign with a mustache painted on it that was taken from the electrical engineering building.

Becky Robinson, IST’16, Blue Springs, Mo.


One Halloween about 1982, some students of Del Day in the MRC (Materials Research Center) decided to honor his role in making specialty glasses in the space shuttle missions. So Heidi Rutz, CerE’85, MS CerE’88, donated her white Honda Civic coupe and the ‘crew’ set out to convert it to a shuttle craft to fly through Rolla and trick-or-treat (heavy on the treat) at the Days’ home. Heidi, Glenn Whichard, MS CerE’83, and I fabricated wings and a rudder with white cardboard and 2x4s. The propulsion unit was three metal ash tray cylinders taped together with a CO2 fire extinguisher in one, mounted out the back of the hatch. Top speed was 35 mph before the whole thing became unstable. Still searching for that photo. Never heard from safety about the empty fire extinguisher! Was there even a safety department back then?

Tom Wetteroth, CerE’79, MS CerE’83, Chandler, Ariz.

Around the Puck

Seeking TBI therapies

By Delia Croessmann, croessmannd@mst.edu Complications from TBI can be life altering. They include post-traumatic seizures and hydrocephalus, as well as serious cognitive and psychological impairments, and the search for treatments to mitigate these neurodegenerative processes is on.

[Read More...]

Understanding the invisible injury

Students advance traumatic brain injury research By Sarah Potter, sarah.potter@mst.edu “Research is creating new knowledge.”–Neil Armstrong  Research keeps professors on the vanguard of knowledge in their fields and allows students to gain a deeper understanding of their area of study. For students and recent graduates researching traumatic brain injury (TBI) at Missouri S&T, the work […]

[Read More...]

Analyzing small molecules for big results

By Delia Croessmann, croessmannd@mst.edu At only 28 years old, Casey Burton, Chem’13, PhD Chem’17, director of medical research at Phelps Health in Rolla and an adjunct professor of chemistry at Missouri S&T, is poised to become a prodigious bioanalytical researcher.

[Read More...]

To prevent and protect

By Peter Ehrhard, ehrhardp@mst.edu Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are an unfortunate but all too common occurrence during military training and deployment. Because mild TBIs often present no obvious signs of head trauma or facial lacerations, they are the most difficult to diagnose at the time of the injury, and patients often perceive the impact as […]

[Read More...]

Q&A

Toughest class … ever Some of your classes may have been a breeze, but others kept you up at all hours studying, and some of you struggled just to pass. As part of his research for the S&T 150th anniversary history book, Larry Gragg , Curators’ Distinguished Teaching Professor emeritus of history and political science, asked […]

[Read More...]