Great minds think unlike

When he first arrived on campus last spring, one of interim Chancellor Christopher G. Maples’ first actions was to turn his Parker Hall office into an art gallery of sorts.

Hanging on the walls today are paintings, drawings and mixed-media works created by recent Missouri S&T graduates, all on display for dignitaries and visitors to view.

“I want everyone who visits this office to see the kind of creativity our students are capable of,” Maples says.

On a campus like Missouri S&T, the arts are sometimes overshadowed by the emphasis on engineering and science. But the arts and STEM disciplines don’t have to exist in separate silos. In fact, each should complement the other. After all, one of the most famous artists of the Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci, sketched machines and studies of human anatomy in addition to painting masterpieces like The Mona Lisa and The Last Supper.

While S&T offers no degrees in art, music or theater, the arts have been interwoven into the campus culture and curriculum for decades. From the Millennium Arch sculpture on the grounds of Castleman Hall to the musical and theatrical performances that occur inside that building, from the Hot Glass Shop to Southwinds literary magazine, the arts — visual, theatrical, literary — thrive at S&T. Last fall’s production of The STEM Monologues, a play written and directed by Jeanne Stanley, associate professor of theater (see story on page 14), illustrates how the arts and sciences can coexist.

Studying the arts is thought to enrich humanity by leading to greater empathy, appreciation of differing perspectives, and greater involvement in civic life. But the arts also offer practical benefits.

“Art makes better engineers,” says Luce Myers, a member of the S&T art faculty. “People who can work with their hands and solve problems visually are often better candidates in the engineering fields.”

Myers recalls one mechanical engineering major who credited his success with a senior design project to the two sculpture courses he took with Myers. And a business major who applied for a marketing job with NASA told Myers that she got the job because of her art minor.

In the pages that follow, you’ll read about how the arts have made a difference in the lives of your fellow graduates, and how they are using the arts to express themselves.

Around the Puck

By the numbers: Fall/Winter 2018

8,607 Students enrolled for the fall semester at Missouri S&T. Classes started Aug. 20. 91 Percentage of first-year freshmen who receive scholarships and financial aid.

[Read More...]

Making tornado alley safer

Growing up in northeast China, Guirong “Grace” Yan didn’t see many tornados in a country where the number of documented twisters is a fraction of those that hit the United States. But as her academic career took Yan to several postdoctoral fellowships and then faculty positions in Indiana, Missouri and Texas, the assistant professor of […]

[Read More...]

Living laboratory houses lead battery research

This past November, Missouri S&T installed two new advanced lead battery microgrid systems at the EcoVillage, a “living laboratory” that is home to S&T’s solar-powered homes.

[Read More...]

Partners for progress

An expansion of the partnership between Missouri S&T and Missouri State University will allow students to pursue a mechanical engineering degree on the Missouri State campus with courses taught by faculty from both institutions. Students began applying this fall. The program will begin in fall 2019.

[Read More...]

Chancellor search is underway

This past August, University of Missouri President Mun Choi announced the formation of a 23-member committee to lead a nationwide search for a chancellor at Missouri S&T.

[Read More...]