After graduation, uncovering a whole new Rolla

Like many students who come to Missouri S&T, Rachel Jung’s exposure to the people and places beyond campus was fairly limited.

Rachel Jung created a photography blog, Uncover Rolla, to help her engage with her community through artistic exploration. Sam O’Keefe/Missouri S&T

A decade later, Rolla is home for Jung, MBA’09, a member of the Miner Alumni Association board and the College of Arts, Sciences, and Business Dean’s Leadership Council. And when the recently promoted director of IT enterprise applications at Brewer Science and mother of two has a moment to spare, the hobby photographer can be found documenting some of the hidden treasures throughout Phelps County that often elude busy S&T students on Uncover Rolla, a blog and social media site.

“Living here as an adult, it’s a completely different experience,” she says. “There are so many more opportunities to engage in the arts, downtown, the wineries and much more.

“I wanted something to connect me to the community,” adds Jung, a Washington, Mo., native who earned an undergraduate degree from Fontbonne University as well as a graduate certificate from S&T in enterprise resource planning. “But I also saw there was a lack of positive information out there about Rolla.”

Jung credits her time as one of the first MBA students on campus for laying the groundwork in her professional life, which began while in grad school with a co-op at Monsanto and grew into a full-time job with that company before she joined Brewer Science in 2012. A particularly strong influence was Bih-Ru Lea, associate professor of business and information technology, who directs the department’s Center for Enterprise Resource Planning.

At Brewer Science, Jung supervises a team of software developers as a project manager, defining a road-mapped path for implementations and software development while ensuring the global company stays current with the latest innovations in cloud computing. She also works closely with vendors on implementations, including ERP and other processes in the company.

She and husband, Steven Jung, CerE’05, MS CerE’07, PhD MSE’10, are parents to Benjamin, 4, and Barrett, 2. The couple met while Rachel worked at the S&T cDNA Resource Center with former biological sciences chair Robert Aronstam. Steve, meanwhile, was collaborating with Roger Brown, now an emeritus professor, in the same department.

The friends who bonded over watching Cardinals games at the Locker Room sports bar started dating after Rachel graduated and moved to St. Louis. Married in 2011, their family’s Rolla roots are only growing firmer, with many weekends spent on a getaway property north of town where Steve hunts and Rachel and the boys take their Jeep 4-wheeling. See Jung’s photographs at uncoverrolla.wordpress.com.

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