What was your favorite food during college?

Before the days of university food service, many Miner alumni ate their meals at eating clubs. Later, campus cafeterias provided the three squares a Miner needed. For some students, a landlady or fraternity or sorority cook served the meals. Others had a favorite restaurant. We asked about your favorite food during college. Here is what you told us.

“Rayl Cafeteria chili (1980–84). The food service at that time would throw all the leftover legumes they had, including lima beans, into a pot of tomato, grease and microscopic meat. A real gastrointestinal delight!”

John LaBerg, CE’84
Schaumburg, Ill.


“Back in the late ’50s, my wife worked at dear old Rolla Drug. I spent many evenings in the back booth. As a scientist, I had to experiment with all of the ice creams and flavorings to concoct the ideal milkshake. The hands-down winner was a pineapple shake made with black walnut ice cream. I paid a big price in poundage gained, but science was served.”

Chas Dohogne, MetE’61
Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif.


“I never liked liver and onions as a kid. But Lambda Chi Alpha’s long-time cook Myrtle Mae Marlow made liver and onions. Since I was away from home, I had to try to eat whatever was served. Much to my surprise I loved Mrs. Marlow’s liver and onions. I have been eating liver and onions ever since.”

Pete Legsdin, Econ’70
Springfield, Mo.


“One of my favorite food experiences was being a part of the ‘meal plan’ at a small Asian restaurant called East Meets West. The woman who ran the place went out of her way to ‘educate’ me on the new types of food I was eating. The meal plan consisted of 20 meals for $40, and that was certainly within my budget. Four or five years after I graduated, I was back in Rolla recruiting for my company. I stopped in to eat one afternoon, and not only did she remember me, she pulled out my five-year-old meal card that still had a couple meals remaining. She insisted that I not pay for my meal since I had already paid for the plan. Wow. Would you ever find a place or service like that today? Very fond memories for me.”

John LeaRussa, ME’88
Houston, Texas

Editor’s note: The owner of East Meets West was the late Meiko Tyler, the wife of John Tyler, research engineer in Missouri S&T’s Rock Mechanics and Explosives Research Center and longtime Solar Car Team advisor. 


“I was at Rolla when Alex’s Pizza opened, and it still is one of the best pizzas I have ever had. It tasted best after a long and difficult EE exam. I was a member of Shamrock Club, board bill was $1 a day. We got steak once in a while, which was great. We ate on picnic tables across from the theater on Pine. I remember eating breakfast and reading the St. Louis Globe-Democrat. I also liked the A&W Root Beer stand; they had a great chili dog. Life was a lot simpler back then.”

Robert Heider, EE’66
St. Louis

Around the Puck

Seeking TBI therapies

By Delia Croessmann, croessmannd@mst.edu Complications from TBI can be life altering. They include post-traumatic seizures and hydrocephalus, as well as serious cognitive and psychological impairments, and the search for treatments to mitigate these neurodegenerative processes is on.

[Read More...]

Understanding the invisible injury

Students advance traumatic brain injury research By Sarah Potter, sarah.potter@mst.edu “Research is creating new knowledge.”–Neil Armstrong  Research keeps professors on the vanguard of knowledge in their fields and allows students to gain a deeper understanding of their area of study. For students and recent graduates researching traumatic brain injury (TBI) at Missouri S&T, the work […]

[Read More...]

Analyzing small molecules for big results

By Delia Croessmann, croessmannd@mst.edu At only 28 years old, Casey Burton, Chem’13, PhD Chem’17, director of medical research at Phelps Health in Rolla and an adjunct professor of chemistry at Missouri S&T, is poised to become a prodigious bioanalytical researcher.

[Read More...]

To prevent and protect

By Peter Ehrhard, ehrhardp@mst.edu Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are an unfortunate but all too common occurrence during military training and deployment. Because mild TBIs often present no obvious signs of head trauma or facial lacerations, they are the most difficult to diagnose at the time of the injury, and patients often perceive the impact as […]

[Read More...]

Q&A

Toughest class … ever Some of your classes may have been a breeze, but others kept you up at all hours studying, and some of you struggled just to pass. As part of his research for the S&T 150th anniversary history book, Larry Gragg , Curators’ Distinguished Teaching Professor emeritus of history and political science, asked […]

[Read More...]