Modern. Refractive. Complex. Glass.

Broken-PiecesDespite its nearly ubiquitous presence in our daily lives, glass has maintained a reputation for fragility for centuries. Typically composed of a mixture of fine powders like limestone, sand and sodium borate, the material — so commonplace as to be nearly invisible — is probably noticed most when it’s broken. Think of the large, jagged shards that are created when a baseball is thrown through a windowpane or of the pebbles that litter the ground when a car window is shattered.

<a href=”https://magazine.mst.edu/files/2014/07/Broken-Pieces.jpg”><img style=”margin: 10px;” alt=”Broken-Pieces” src=”https://magazine.mst.edu/files/2014/07/Broken-Pieces.jpg” width=”300″ height=”361″ /></a>The use of glass in everyday life can be attributed, at least in part, to its characteristics — hardness, chemical resistance, durability and optical properties. These properties, and its ever-growing combination of compositions, make glass such a perfect substance. They’re also what allows glass to move beyond its brittle persona.

Today’s modern glasses look very different from the blown glass or lead-crystal glass created centuries ago, and even the sheet glass developed in the early 20th century. No longer restrained by archaic fabrication techniques, today’s glasses are shattering stereotypes and causing people to rethink glass. It bends. It heals wounds. It strengthens steel. There’s seemingly no limit to what glass can do.

The following stories are just a few examples of how Missouri S&T students and faculty are reshaping the future of glass.

Around the Puck

“Forged in Gold: Missouri S&T’s First 150 Years”

In the 1870s, Rolla seemed an unlikely location for a new college. There were only about 1,400 residents in a community with more saloons than houses of worship. There were no paved streets, sewers or water mains. To visitors, there seemed to be as many dogs, hogs, horses, ducks and geese as humans walking the dusty streets.

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By the numbers: Fall/Winter 2019

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Bringing clean water to South America

Assessing water quality, surveying mountaintop locations and building systems to catch rainwater — that’s how members of S&T’s chapter of Engineers Without Borders spent their summer break.

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Geothermal goals exceeded

After five years of operation, Missouri S&T’s geothermal energy system continues to outperform expectations. S&T facilities operations staff originally predicted the geothermal system would reduce campus water usage by over 10% — roughly 10 million gallons per year. The system, which went online in May 2014, cut actual water usage by 18 million to 20 […]

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What happens in Vegas…may appear in print

In his latest volume of Las Vegas lore, historian Larry Gragg says it was deliberate publicity strategies that changed the perception of Sin City from a regional tourist destination where one could legally gamble and access legalized prostitution just outside the city limits, to a family vacation spot filled with entertainment options and surrounded by […]

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