Briefly

Diana Ahmad, associate professor of history and political science and campus archivist, was named 2011 Woman of the Year in April. The award is presented each year to a female faculty member in recognition of her efforts to improve the campus environment for women and minorities. The award was created by Cynthia Tang, Econ’85, founder and former chair of Insight Industries Inc. and a member of the S&T Board of Trustees.


Missouri S&T’s custodial and landscape services department received the Missouri Arbor Award of Excellence for efforts to improve trees in the community. The award is from the Missouri Department of Conservation and the Missouri Community Forestry Council.
Walt Eversman, Curators’ Professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, was named a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics in May for his contributions to the aeronautics field.
Joseph D. Smith became the university’s first Laufer Chair of Energy on July 1. Formerly the manager of advanced process and decision systems for Idaho National Laboratory, Smith holds a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Brigham Young University. His expertise is in the design of industrial-scale coal gasification systems. The chair was established in 2009 through a $3.4 million gift from Wayne Laufer, CE’67, retired co-founder and CEO of Bois d’Arc Energy Inc., and his wife, Gayle Laufer.
Jay W. Goff, vice provost and dean of enrollment management at Missouri S&T, recently joined the staff of Saint Louis University to lead that campus’s enrollment management efforts. Goff led the S&T enrollment management office from 2001 through August. Laura Stoll, S&T registrar, will serve as interim dean.
Lea-Ann Morton, director of career opportunities and employer relations (COER) since 2003, was named assistant vice chancellor for development on Aug. 1. Edna Grover-Bisker, associate director of COER since 2008, replaces Morton as director of COER.

Around the Puck

“Forged in Gold: Missouri S&T’s First 150 Years”

In the 1870s, Rolla seemed an unlikely location for a new college. There were only about 1,400 residents in a community with more saloons than houses of worship. There were no paved streets, sewers or water mains. To visitors, there seemed to be as many dogs, hogs, horses, ducks and geese as humans walking the dusty streets.

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By the numbers: Fall/Winter 2019

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Bringing clean water to South America

Assessing water quality, surveying mountaintop locations and building systems to catch rainwater — that’s how members of S&T’s chapter of Engineers Without Borders spent their summer break.

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Geothermal goals exceeded

After five years of operation, Missouri S&T’s geothermal energy system continues to outperform expectations. S&T facilities operations staff originally predicted the geothermal system would reduce campus water usage by over 10% — roughly 10 million gallons per year. The system, which went online in May 2014, cut actual water usage by 18 million to 20 […]

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What happens in Vegas…may appear in print

In his latest volume of Las Vegas lore, historian Larry Gragg says it was deliberate publicity strategies that changed the perception of Sin City from a regional tourist destination where one could legally gamble and access legalized prostitution just outside the city limits, to a family vacation spot filled with entertainment options and surrounded by […]

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