Chad Shockley: wide receiver

Major: Senior in history with an emphasis on high school social studies education.

Shockley.jpg

Chad Shockley. (Photo by B.A. Rupert)

Major: Senior in history with an emphasis on high school social studies education.
Scholarships: Les Clark, Bud Mercier and the Spirit of Jackling.
Mentors: Outside of my parents, my mentors are my teachers, coaches and grandparents. I have had the blessing of being coached by outstanding people, beginning with my dad as my Little League coach.
Why Missouri S&T: Before I started making any recruiting trips, former Miners head coach Kirby Cannon came to my high school and told me that he had watched me play football for the past four years and offered me a very nice scholarship to play for the Miners. He told me to keep his offer in my back pocket and visit the other schools, but to talk to him again before I made my decision. I made a few trips, got a few offers, but in the end decided that the best fit would be with Missouri S&T because of the chance to play as a freshman as well as the Miners’ style of offense — a receiver’s dream!
Best S&T football memory: Winning the Great Lakes Football Conference with a record of 7-4 in 2008. We had one of the nation’s top offensive units, led the Great Lakes Football Conference in total offense and ranked 12th nationally. Our team worked very hard at every position and we found ways to win football games. I honestly hope my best football memory at Missouri S&T is yet to come in my last season.
Goals for the 2010 football season: Contributing in every way that I can to help the Miners be successful. I will strive to attain All-American status both in the classroom and on the football field. I have a tremendous responsibility as a team captain to help provide leadership for our team. I’m one of the veterans now and the new guys coming in need to understand the commitment and work ethic required for our team to be successful.
On the DL: Most people who know me well know that I eat, sleep and breathe football. I’ve asked myself many times why these injuries happen. The best thing I can come up with is that through adversity grows character and determination. I hope for my senior season I have plenty of both and that I remain injury-free for the remainder of my football career.

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