Where it comes from, where it goes

Petroleum, coal and natural gas combined to provide more than 83 percent of the energy generated in the United States in 2008, as the flow chart below illustrates. Meanwhile, three of the most talked-about renewable energy sources – wind, solar and biomass – combined to create just 12.4 percent of all generated energy. While more than 40 percent of all generated energy powered homes, businesses, factories, and our planes, trains and automobiles, 57 percent of it was rejected – or wasted as emissions or exhaust.

Illustration: James Provost
Source: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Department of Energy

 

Around the Puck

“Forged in Gold: Missouri S&T’s First 150 Years”

In the 1870s, Rolla seemed an unlikely location for a new college. There were only about 1,400 residents in a community with more saloons than houses of worship. There were no paved streets, sewers or water mains. To visitors, there seemed to be as many dogs, hogs, horses, ducks and geese as humans walking the dusty streets.

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By the numbers: Fall/Winter 2019

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Bringing clean water to South America

Assessing water quality, surveying mountaintop locations and building systems to catch rainwater — that’s how members of S&T’s chapter of Engineers Without Borders spent their summer break.

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Geothermal goals exceeded

After five years of operation, Missouri S&T’s geothermal energy system continues to outperform expectations. S&T facilities operations staff originally predicted the geothermal system would reduce campus water usage by over 10% — roughly 10 million gallons per year. The system, which went online in May 2014, cut actual water usage by 18 million to 20 […]

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What happens in Vegas…may appear in print

In his latest volume of Las Vegas lore, historian Larry Gragg says it was deliberate publicity strategies that changed the perception of Sin City from a regional tourist destination where one could legally gamble and access legalized prostitution just outside the city limits, to a family vacation spot filled with entertainment options and surrounded by […]

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Comments

  1. Dan Kruvand says

    Informative graphical presentation on pg 9, but I believe there is an error in the percentage of power generated by Wind in the US. If the coal graphic on the next page is correct, appears that the decimal is off, ie, the % contribution for wind power should be 0.845%, not 8.45%.
    Really enjoyed the series of articles in this edition. Hope you continue to feature important engineering topics in the future!

  2. This is a great visual to highlight the real energy problem – Efficiency!