Flipping the switch on toxic television

Posted by
On June 9, 2009

When the switch to all-digital broadcast signals is complete, thousands of old analog televisions in the United States will become obsolete. Oscar Hernandez, CE’08, wants to make sure they don’t end up in landfills, where their components can become toxic when exposed to the elements.


As part of a solid waste management class service-learning project, Hernandez produced a brochure to educate Missourians on the possible impact of the digital conversion. He says cathode-ray tube televisions (CRTs) should be taken to a recycling company that follows electronics recycling standards.

“I had an old television set sitting in my garage,” Hernandez admitted. “I just left it there because I didn’t know how to dispose of it. I want to educate people so that they will know the proper way to dispose of their old televisions.”

mm
Posted by

On June 9, 2009. Posted in News, Summer 2009

Recent Posts

Celebrating 150 Years

Celebrating 150 Years

From hardscrabble, “country academy” roots, how we became a global research university Rolla in [...]
Innovation, the Rolla way

Innovation, the Rolla way

Since our founding, S&T and innovation have been tightly connected. From advances in materials,[...]
Keeping history alive

Keeping history alive

Several authors have written history books about S&T, but no tome can contain all the informati[...]
New book chronicles university's history

New book chronicles university's history

Larry Gragg, Curators’ Distinguished Teaching Professor emeritus of history and political science, [...]
What lies ahead for S&T's next 150 years?

What lies ahead for S&T's next 150 years?

 As Missouri S&T launches its 150th anniversary celebration, the world continues to recove[...]