Tiny is terrific

The ultrasmall holds huge possibilities for the future if you ask Julia E. Medvedeva, assistant professor of physics.


Medvedeva is examining optical transparency and electrical conductivity to find out how atoms are put together on the microscopic level. Such in-depth understanding of underlying physical phenomena allows her to design new materials with properties required for a particular application.
Medvedeva is interested in a unique class of materials called transparent conductors, which share the seemingly contradictory properties of being optically transparent, like glass, and electrically conductive, like metal. Transparent conductors are vital components in many devices, including solar cells, smart windows, flat-panel and flexible displays, invisible, or “see-through,” electronics, and gas sensors.
With financial support from the National Science Foundation and the American Chemical Society, Medvedeva is working to develop new transparent conductor materials that are more efficient, easier to fabricate, less expensive and environmentally friendly. Her preliminary research shows that with proper preparation calcium, aluminum or silicone oxides, the most abundant substances in the earth’s crust, can be made electrically conductive while maintaining their superior optical properties.

Around the Puck

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By the numbers: Fall/Winter 2019

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Geothermal goals exceeded

After five years of operation, Missouri S&T’s geothermal energy system continues to outperform expectations. S&T facilities operations staff originally predicted the geothermal system would reduce campus water usage by over 10% — roughly 10 million gallons per year. The system, which went online in May 2014, cut actual water usage by 18 million to 20 […]

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What happens in Vegas…may appear in print

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