Chevron: College graduates are valuable

When it comes to the future of energy production, Chevron Corp. sees college graduates – particularly UMR graduates – as one of its most valuable resources.
This summer, Chevron donated $1.5 million to UMR to establish an educational and research partnership that will help meet the needs of the energy industry.


“Today’s energy industry offers a vibrant, exciting future for young people as we address the world’s growing need for energy products,” says Mark Puckett, president of Chevron Energy Technology Co.
UMR is home to the only petroleum engineering program in Missouri, and many students in the program end up with careers at Chevron. More than 120 UMR graduates are employed by the company.
“This latest partnership between Chevron and UMR solidifies our long-standing relationship,” says UMR Chancellor John F. Carney III. “UMR graduates have a long history of contributing to the success of Chevron Corp., and UMR is very appreciative of this $1.5 million of support for the university.”
Chevron’s gift will provide funds for faculty support and development, including hiring additional petroleum engineering faculty at UMR. It will also give UMR faculty the chance for some industry experience at Chevron through an in-residence industry professional and in-house training program. The gift will also benefit UMR students through scholarships, distance learning offerings and industry internships. The intention is to develop a broader overall relationship with the university. Some of Chevron’s subject matter experts have already taught logging classes at UMR.
“The funds will be used to strengthen our petroleum engineering and geosciences and technologies programs, providing a source of funding for students and faculty, and facilitating research activities of importance to Chevron,” Carney says. “This support comes at a critical time for the United States as we search for new sources of energy to meet our national and international demands.”
For Chevron, it’s also an investment in creativity.
“At Chevron, we believe in the power of ‘human energy’ – our employees’ abilities to find fresh, innovative ways to deliver more energy products and improve the quality of life for people around the world,” says Puckett. “Our approach is grounded in positive partnerships and collaboration, and we welcome the enthusiasm and creativity from future generations of graduates to help us meet the world’s challenges.”

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