What’s up with the puck?

The Puck

It looks like a puck. At least, it’s shaped like a puck. It must be a puck. That’s what UMR students decided after a rather mysterious concrete and rock structure, shaped like a huge hockey puck, showed up on campus in the early 1970s.

Many rumors about the Puck were circulated back then, and some of them became myths over time. The Puck is thought to be the base of a missing statue. Some people say it used to be a fountain but was filled in with concrete. Others think a time capsule or lost treasure might be buried below the surface.

The truth is, the Puck is simply a stage for the various performances that have occurred over the years on campus. But, of course, it’s also more than that.

The Puck is a frame of reference – as in, if you stand in front of the Puck and look to the north, you’ll see the UMR library. It used to complement the twin buildings of the University Center complex.

But now that University Center-West has been demolished, the Puck is situated more or less by itself in the mall area between University Center-East and the library, and it’s apparently there to stay. That the Puck should stand out even more is only fitting. After all, this stage has been at the center of attention for a lot of big events in UMR history.

In addition to countless musical performances, speeches, and fashion shows, students have been painting the Puck to commemorate St. Pat’s celebrations since the 1980s. Lots of weddings have taken place at the Puck, and it’s probably safe to say a few first kisses went down at the old puckster.

Sure, Mizzou has its columns. Texas has a tall tower. Georgia has some famous hedges that football games are played between. Ohio State even has a big horseshoe. But UMR has the one and only Puck.

Around the Puck

“Forged in Gold: Missouri S&T’s First 150 Years”

In the 1870s, Rolla seemed an unlikely location for a new college. There were only about 1,400 residents in a community with more saloons than houses of worship. There were no paved streets, sewers or water mains. To visitors, there seemed to be as many dogs, hogs, horses, ducks and geese as humans walking the dusty streets.

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By the numbers: Fall/Winter 2019

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Bringing clean water to South America

Assessing water quality, surveying mountaintop locations and building systems to catch rainwater — that’s how members of S&T’s chapter of Engineers Without Borders spent their summer break.

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Geothermal goals exceeded

After five years of operation, Missouri S&T’s geothermal energy system continues to outperform expectations. S&T facilities operations staff originally predicted the geothermal system would reduce campus water usage by over 10% — roughly 10 million gallons per year. The system, which went online in May 2014, cut actual water usage by 18 million to 20 […]

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What happens in Vegas…may appear in print

In his latest volume of Las Vegas lore, historian Larry Gragg says it was deliberate publicity strategies that changed the perception of Sin City from a regional tourist destination where one could legally gamble and access legalized prostitution just outside the city limits, to a family vacation spot filled with entertainment options and surrounded by […]

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