The quest for a new chancellor

The quest to find a new UMR chancellor began just days after former Chancellor Gary Thomas’ Sept. 1, 2004, announcement that he would retire in August 2005.

On Sept. 14, 2004, University of Missouri System President Elson S. Floyd appointed a 20-member committee to assist with the search. The group included UMR faculty, staff, students, alumni and Rolla community representatives. The committee worked with an executive recruitment firm to find three candidates to present to Floyd, who made the final decision.

With Larry Gragg, Curators’ Teaching Professor of history and political science, at the helm, the committee held open meetings last October to give faculty, staff, students and the Rolla community a chance to share their thoughts on the traits they hoped to find in a new chancellor. Armed with that feedback, the group narrowed its focus.

It wasn’t long until the search process became a controversial one.

The recruitment firm suggested that the best candidates would be drawn to a closed search – one that allowed the campus community no input on the choice of finalists. The committee agreed.

The decision initially drew several complaints. “The committee understood why people were angry about the closed search and we sought to deal with it by meeting with any group that wished to discuss it with us,” Gragg says. After several meetings, the committee voted to confirm its decision for a closed search, but the committee received no more emails expressing opposition to the decision.

Gragg believes the move for a closed search was a good decision.

“Committee members are firmly persuaded that the closed search produced a stronger pool of candidates,” Gragg says. “Indeed, most of the finalists indicated that they would not have considered the position had it been an open search.”

In December, the group reviewed applications and selected 10 candidates for off-campus interviews, which were held in January. In February, five finalists were brought to campus for a second round of interviews. The committee presented President Floyd with its top three finalists on March 2 and an official announcement of Jack Carney’s hiring was made on March 24.

“While the search was very time consuming, it truly was worth it from the committee’s perspective,” Gragg adds. “The members are very excited to be able to attract a leader of Jack Carney’s caliber as our next chancellor.”

Around the Puck

Q&A: Miners got game

What was the most memorable sports team during your time on campus? As part of his research for the S&T 150th history book, Larry Gragg, Curators’ Distinguished Teaching Professor emeritus of history and political science, asked you to share your memories. Here are a few of your answers.

[Read More...]

Honoring new academy members

In October, 12 alumni and friends were inducted into Missouri S&T academies. Academy membership recognizes careers of distinction and invites members to share their wisdom, influence and resources with faculty and students. Some academies hold induction ceremonies in the fall, others in the spring.

[Read More...]

Boosting cyber-physical security

A wide array of complex systems that rely on computers — from public water supply systems and electric grids to chemical plants and self-driving vehicles — increasingly come under not just digital but physical attacks. Bruce McMillin, professor and interim chair of computer science at Missouri S&T, is looking to change that by developing stronger safeguards […]

[Read More...]

MXene discovery could improve energy storage

In spite of their diminutive size, 2-D titanium carbide materials known as MXenes are “quite reactive” to water, a discovery S&T researchers say could have implications for energy storage and harvesting applications such as batteries, supercapacitors and beyond. Their findings were published in 2018 in the American Chemical Society journal Inorganic Chemistry.

[Read More...]

A faster charge for electric vehicles

One drawback of electric vehicles (EVs) is the time it takes to charge them. But what if you could plug in your EV and fully charge it as quickly as it takes to fill up a conventional car with gasoline? Missouri S&T researchers, in collaboration with three private companies, are working to make speedy charging […]

[Read More...]