Small world

Last September, Max Boeh, MinE’12 (left), was in Rolla recruiting at the Fall Career Fair. While wandering around the Havener Center during a break, looking for someone to have lunch with, he was surprised to see his brother, Mitch Boeh, ME’09, who was also on campus recruiting. Neither knew the other was there. Max is a tunnel connections engineer with Kiewit Underground Construction Co., based out of Chicago, and Mitch is a mechanical engineer for Abengoa in St. Louis.

Promoting STEM in Arkansas

Lynda Melgarejo, EMgt’05, MS EMgt’13, was featured in the October 2013 issue of Inviting Arkansas magazine for her work promoting science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. She and 11 other STEM advocates were honored at the Museum of Discovery in Little Rock, Ark., on Oct. 17. Melgarejo is the production information manufacturing engineering supervisor at Caterpillar in Little Rock. [Read more…]

Sister of the seas

Mary Beth Reissen, MS Tch Chem’70, represented the American Society of International Law at the 14th meeting of the Open-Ended Informal Consultative Process on Oceans and the Law of the Sea, held at the United Nations Headquarters in New York City in June. [Read more…]

Letters of compassion and encouragement, shared

Take a moment to read some of the online comments at amazon.com about Donn Ziebell’s book My Letters to a Prisoner — I had not met and you’ll find a small but captivated group of people who were touched, inspired and entertained by the memoir.

In the book’s foreword Ziebell, MetE’57, writes that his letters to the incarcerated stranger were intended to give the man “tangible proof that someone really cares and has invested quality, personal time to communicate with him.” Ziebell says that the non-fiction work details his “experiences, travel, activities and married life” and hopes it will encourage others to also write to lonely people.

Ziebell is an accomplished artist (yurart.com) who worked in manufacturing and consulting for 30 years and spent a number of years as a licensed minister in The Evangelical Free Church of America. He presented business seminars in Russia in the 1990s, which provided material for a “cross-cultural experiential dissertation” for his Ph.D. from The Union Institute University in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Mike McEvilly: A natural leader

Mike McEvilly

Mike McEvilly

Whether he’s working on a deep-water offshore development in the Gulf of Mexico or helping Missouri S&T produce top-notch engineers, Mike McEvilly, CE’80, MS EMgt’81, is a natural leader. McEvilly, project director of Hess Corp.’s Tubular Bells Development, supports Missouri S&T as a dedicated member of the Academy of Engineering Management, Academy of Civil Engineers and the Miner Alumni Association board of directors.

[Read more…]

Seth Burgett: His buds are for you

Seth BurgettSix-hour workouts can take a toll on the fittest of athletes. But when Seth Burgett, ME’94, was training for a triathlon in 2007, it wasn’t his legs or back that caused him the most pain.

[Read more…]

Hugh and Linda Cole: Silver and Gold Donors

SilverandGoldSix months after graduating from high school in Hazelwood, Mo., Hugh Cole, EMgt’72, enrolled at Missouri S&T, determined to become the first engineer in his family (and first in his family to receive a college degree).

[Read more…]

Matt O’Keefe: memorable mentor

Walk into Straumanis-James Hall and the building’s relaxed atmosphere may be the first thing you notice. The building is home to the Materials Research Center and its director, Matt O’Keefe, MetE’85.

O’Keefe, who is known for his friendliness and accessibility, will tell you he didn’t set the building’s tone — that he’s just trying to maintain what Bill James (professor emeritus of chemistry and a namesake of the building) created when he started the MRC back in 1964. James, who turned 90 in September, still has an office down the hall from O’Keefe’s.

But O’Keefe’s influence is undeniable. He’s been a popular professor at S&T since 1999, receiving several teaching awards along the way. He has a genuine concern for his students’ success, both in his department and in the Phi Kappa Theta fraternity, where he serves as faculty advisor.

Rick Szevery, MetE’02, a senior engineer with ArcelorMittal Burns Harbor, is grateful for O’Keefe’s mentorship.

“Dr. O’Keefe’s conversational teaching style and quirky sense of humor made his classes very enjoyable and memorable,” Szevery says. “He organized the course information in a way that made it easier to comprehend than in my other courses. And he was always positive and helpful. I really valued his advice and our conversations.”

O’Keefe was born and reared in Rolla, the son of the late Thomas J. O’Keefe, Curators’ Professor emeritus of metallurgical engineering. The younger O’Keefe took graduate courses while working for AT&T Bell Laboratories in Allentown, Pa., and earned a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign while working for the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio.

Although he’s laid back, he’s no pushover and is honest with students. “Students don’t always appreciate or like what I have to say,” he says. “But sometimes it’s what they need to hear.”

Margaret Olcott and Family: building a legacy

During the final weeks of his life, Eugene L. Olcott, MetE’40, decided he wanted to give something back to the school that had prepared him for a successful career. “He wanted to give something tangible that would carry his name and be of use to the students,” says his widow, Margaret Olcott.

[Read more…]

Meet John Eash

John F. Eash, AE’79, MS EMgt’90, director of F/A-18 production operations for the Boeing Co. in St. Louis, began his two-year term as president of the Miner Alumni Association in October. Missouri S&T Magazine staff sat down with him to ask a few questions.

What is your vision for the association?
The Miner Alumni Association will continue to be a growing, thriving organization that is positioned well to support alumni, students, faculty and staff, and the Rolla community.

What do you hope to accomplish during your presidency?
It’s really all about what our association will accomplish. We aligned our committee structure to support our strategic priorities, with great committee leaders and members assigned to each. Over the next two years, they will accomplish great things — increasing our financial giving, strengthening our alumni sections, and improving communications with campus organizations and other constituents. I also look forward to increasing the number of active Miner Alumni Association members and the completion of the Hasselmann Alumni House.

What do you feel is the most important part of the alumni-university relationship?
The most important aspect of our alumni-university relationship is the shared responsibility of helping our students succeed during their college careers and beyond through financial assistance, career counseling, recruiting, mentorship and academic tutoring, just to name a few. When our students succeed in college and in business, it strengthens our reputation as a premier technological research university we can all be proud of.

Why should young alumni get involved with the association?
The ability to stay connected with old friends and make new ones, build professional networks with fellow alumni, and feel the pride that comes with giving back financially or through volunteering time to an organization that has helped many students — some that otherwise may not have graduated from S&T.