Doctoral student an ASTRO participant

Vaibhav Khane, MS NucE’07, MS ChE’12, PhD ChE’14, recently spent seven months working on models for a new low-enriched uranium core for Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s High Flux Isotope Reactor as part of its Advanced Short-Term Research Opportunity (ASTRO) Program. Khane used multi-physics codes to model designs to replace the reactor’s current highly enriched uranium core. [Read more…]

Fond memories of the Quad

Jamie (Johnson) Farrell, ECE’01, recently shared a story of how she met her husband, Shannon, when she lived in Kelly Hall.  [Read more…]

From engineer to movie producer

After a 38-year career in mechanical engineering, John Weekley, ME’74, sold his process control company, PROCONEX, in 2011 to pursue a career in the film industry as a movie producer.  [Read more…]

Long-lost civilization sparks book

A newspaper article about an archaeological dig in Chesterfield, Mo., gave Ellen M. (Monti) Meyer, CSci’77, the idea for her first novel, Chronicle of the Mound Builders: An Angela Hunter Mystery[Read more…]

Oak Ridge brothers: John and Robert Wagner

For more than 14 years, brothers John Wagner, NucE’92, and Robert Wagner, ME’93, MS ME’95, PhD ME’99, have worked at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Department of Energy’s largest multi-program science and energy laboratory. ORNL owns a piece of history through its role in World War II’s Manhattan Project. It is also home to Titan, one of the world’s fastest supercomputers. [Read more…]

Tulsa turf team

Love it or hate it, artificial turf has many benefits — including year-round field use and an even playing surface. In October, students voted to fund 75 percent of the $2.4 million required to install turf on S&T’s football and intramural fields, but more is needed. [Read more…]

Keeping S&T green, one bike at a time

Dan Fuhrmann, ME’99, owner of Route 66 Bicycles in Rolla, wants to make S&T the model of a bicycle-friendly campus. Fuhrmann donated a Dero Fixit stand, an ADA-compliant bicycle-repair station. It was installed outside Curtis Laws Wilson Library last fall. “When I was a student, bicycles were technically banned from campus, although the rule was rarely enforced,” says Fuhrmann, former president of the S&T Cycling Club. That has changed and Fuhrmann wants everyone to know that S&T is a bicycle-friendly campus. “Bicycle infrastructure is a great investment and I realize that. I hope to bring others on board. “Anyone can use the stand to perform repairs or adjustments on their bicycle, or stop for a quick shot of air in their tires,” Fuhrmann says. It includes a pump with a gauge and also has most of the tools necessary to perform minor adjustments. “If it keeps people riding their bikes instead of driving, then it’s a good thing.”

‘Inventern’ finalist

Ron Erickson, IST’11, is building his own rally car from the ground up. By himself. The project got him noticed by MythBusters star Adam Savage, who held a contest last fall to find the next “Inventern” for his website tested.com. [Read more…]

Rolla grads play key roles in I-70 bridge construction

 

Miner alumni involved with the bridge project. See story for the names of those pictured.

Miner alumni involved with the bridge project. See story for the names of those pictured.

A number of Rolla graduates were involved in building the new Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge, which crosses the Mississippi River connecting downtown St. Louis and southwestern Illinois via Interstate Highway 70. The bridge opened to traffic on Feb. 9.

On July 26, ironworkers reached a milestone by positioning the 80-foot-long, 30,000-pound final floor beam.

According to Randy Hitt, CE’87, bridge project director with the Missouri Department of Transportation, a poster of Joe Miner was placed on the last piece of structural steel to celebrate the “Rolla heritage of the engineers working on the project.”

“The cable-stayed bridge with a 1,500-foot main span is the third-longest in the United States,” says Hitt.

Pictured from left: Ken Berry, CE’94, quality control inspector with Shalom Services; Chris Kelly, CE’03, quality assurance inspector with MoDOT; Kenny Bassler, EE’11, electrical  project manager with Paynecrest, Randy Hitt, CE’87, bridge inspector with MoDOT; Chris Morgan, CE’02, quality assurance inspector with MoDOT; Henry Woods, CE’97, quality assurance inspector with MoDOT; Ron Leible, CE’87, utilities engineer with Crawford, Murphy & Tilly; John Grana, CE’85, resident engineer with MoDOT; Tom Tavernaro, CE’87, project manager with Alberici Corp., Massman Construction and Traylor Bros. Not pictured is Jeff Church, CE’84, deputy project director with the Illinois Department of Transportation.

A passion for fitness

Michael Wuest, Bus’07, MBA’08, is campus dining services marketing manager at the University of Missouri-Columbia and now also an owner, manager and trainer at CrossFit COMO in Columbia. He founded the gym with a friend in June 2013.

“When I came to Mizzou in 2011, I was reintroduced to CrossFit through the ‘300’ workout (the workout the actors in the movie 300 did to get so buff). It killed me, took me forever, but I was hooked,” he says.

Wuest says the workout changed his life, making him more confident and improving his outlook on life. After becoming a trainer and working with others for several months, he decided to utilize his business education and open the gym.

“Since we’ve been open, we have touched more than 500 lives,” he says. “It’s been one of the most rewarding endeavors I’ve ever done.”