Building a better battery

The battery in your cell phone and laptop may one day hold a longer charge thanks to the work of Xinhua Liang, an assistant professor of chemical and biochemical engineering at Missouri S&T. [Read more…]

In print

Susan Murray, professor of engineering management and interim chair of psychological science, and Matthew Thimgan, assistant professor of biological sciences, published Human Fatigue Risk Factors.

Not your average Fitbit

Imagine a device you can wear around your wrist, much like a Fitbit activity tracker. Unlike a Fitbit, however, this device not only tracks the steps you take in a day, but it also records movement and other bio-signals as well as information about the ambient environment. [Read more…]

Seeing it through and seeing through it

At 7 a.m. on a weekday, many college students are still asleep. Others hit the snooze button and struggle to get out of bed for an 8 a.m. class. But Matt Horst, EE’14, is usually already at work in the Applied Microwave Nondestructive Testing Laboratory (AMNTL) at Missouri S&T. [Read more…]

Hitting the sweet spot

While some undergraduate students peer through microscopes or write computer programs for their research projects, senior Arielle Bodine made the world of professional golf her laboratory. The applied math and economics double major recently took an eagle-eyed look at the factors that led Phil Mickelson and 46 other top professional golfers to pick up valuable endorsements. [Read more…]

Baking bridges

Kristen Donnell, MS EE’03, PhD EE’10, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at Missouri S&T, is using microwave energy to test concrete and rehabilitated aluminum, and in the future her work could lead to safer bridges and aircraft parts. [Read more…]

Saving the bats

White-nose syndrome kills bats by the millions. If not stopped, it could disrupt an entire ecosystem. But a group of Missouri S&T students learned that a compound found in citrus fruit can slow the disease. [Read more…]

Recovering oil with CO2

Traditional methods of oil recovery call for flooding well formations with water, but often as much as two-thirds of the oil is left behind through this process. Carbon dioxide is more efficient for oil recovery because it dissolves into oil and reduces its viscosity, but that approach also has problems. [Read more…]

Volcano warning

Much like National Weather Service sirens signal impending severe weather, so too may a similar system warn us before earthquakes strike or volcanoes erupt.

[Read more…]

Imaging the final frontier

A Missouri S&T aerospace engineering professor is developing a microsatellite imager that could be used to check satellites, do small repairs or refuel spacecraft — and keep astronauts from making risky exploratory missions when something goes wrong. [Read more…]