Going viral for good health

Working with atomic-scale particles known as quantum dots, Missouri S&T biologist Yue-Wern Huang hopes to develop a new and better way to deliver and monitor proteins, medicine, DNA and other molecules at the cellular level. The approach would work much like a virus, but would deliver healing instead of sickness.

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The future of solar: cleaner process, better cells

Future innovations in solar energy could be percolating in at least two Missouri S&T labs, where researchers Lifeng Zhang and Jay A. Switzer are working on separate projects.

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Explosive counterterrorism

Grad student Phillip Mulligan is trying to make improvised explosive devices more powerful with the idea of eventually making them less deadly.

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Greener rubber hits the road

In the early 1980s, author William Least Heat-Moon chronicled his travels on America’s forgotten routes in Blue Highways. Today, some Missouri S&T researchers are working on making the nation’s highways green – or at least greener.

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Fueling the nation’s energy research

Missouri S&T researchers believe the power grid of the future will operate much like the Internet, except it will transmit energy and not data, speeding renewable electric-energy technology into every home and business in the country. This National Science Foundation-funded study is just one of a number of energy-related research projects at Missouri S&T that distinguishes the university as a leader in energy research.

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Hey, bartender

It may look like a plain wooden box, but this computer-controlled bartender could give restaurants of the future a smarter way to serve sodas and mixed drinks.

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Improving explosives and materials, nanoscopically

Recent experiments to create a fast-reacting explosive by concocting it at the nano level could mean more spectacular firework displays. But even more impressive to the Missouri S&T professor who led the research, the method used to mix chemicals at that tiny scale could lead to new strong porous materials for high-temperature applications, from thermal insulation in jet engines to industrial chemical reactors.

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Ethanol production: a ‘drink-or-drive’ issue

Federal requirements to increase the production of ethanol have developed into a “drink-or-drive” issue in the Midwest as a result of biofuel production’s impact on water supplies and water quality, says Joel Burken, professor of environmental engineering at Missouri S&T, in the May 1 issue of the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

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Another band of brothers

Despite the stirring portrayal in Band of Brothers, Easy Company of the 101st Airborne Division was not the first to enter Adolf Hitler’s Berchtesgaden mountain retreat near the end of World War II, says military historian John C. McManus in his latest book.

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Country music, city roots

A fan of country music since childhood, Patrick Huber, associate professor of history and political science, asserts in his latest book that the origins of the genre in the South lie not in rural communities as previously believed, but in cities and towns. His book, Linthead Stomp: The Creation of Country Music in the Piedmont South, was published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2008. The book also documents the role of textile mill workers in early country music.

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