S&T in space

All across campus, Missouri S&T professors — and their students — are conducting research that could have implications for future space travel. [Read more…]

Pushing the boundaries of space exploration

Space tourism could start in the next  two years, says Jeff Thornburg, AE’96, but it’s going to be expensive.

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Lifesaving flood relief

At one point during the heavy rain that fell across southern Missouri this past April, the only thing volunteer first responder Dan Israel, CE’83, could see from his back porch was the swollen North Fork River — a river that usually flows 100 yards from his house.

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The business side of healthcare

For some, the mention of “healthcare” brings to mind doctors and nurses — the people on the front lines of the medical industry. But, as with any other industry, there is a business side to healthcare. [Read more…]

The traveler

Up until last summer, Heather Castelli, ME’17, had visited more foreign countries than U.S. states. [Read more…]

Miner memories

In a letter published in a June 1945 issue of the student newspaper, the Missouri Miner, then-Dean Curtis Laws Wilson, Hon’46, wrote to editor Charles W. “Bill” Bennett to speak up for disgruntled faculty members who felt they were being treated unfairly in the Miner. Believing the university would run more smoothly if the faculty and students got along, the faculty voted to require the editor to report directly to the faculty through Wilson. [Read more…]

Josh Pribe leading by example

Josh Pribe, ME’16, spent three years of college knee-deep in residential life leadership. He wouldn’t trade the experience for anything. [Read more…]

Cailey Baker: Catching Miners

Miner softball catcher Cailey Baker loves the excitement of playing behind the plate. [Read more…]

Household items

Take a look around your house. How many things you see were patented by Miner alumni? Maybe more than you think. Here are just a few examples of household Miner inventions.

The air up there

Before the era of jet planes, scientists didn’t realize that thunderstorm cells could stretch as high as 90,000 feet into the atmosphere. [Read more…]