Protecting paradise

Shooting a spy satellite out of the sky is the stuff of science fiction movies. For Andrew Jackson, petty officer second class in the U.S. Navy, it’s just another day at the office.

[Read more…]

Greatest generations: Stories with Maj. Gen. Robert Bay

The patrons at McDonald’s have noticed us. A few of them eventually come over to thank the two uniformed soldiers at our table for their service. What these civilians don’t realize is that a third soldier at our table, an older gentleman in plain clothes, is an honest-to-God general who started his service to the country during World War II.

[Read more…]

Jumping in Beijing

When Tyrone Smith, Hist’07, first joined the track program at Missouri S&T, his best long jump fell short of what it would take to qualify for the Olympics by more than four feet. Since then, Smith has been jumping farther and farther. He won three All-America awards and multiple long jump championships in the Great Lakes Valley Conference. And this year Smith was so good that he qualified for the Olympics.

[Read more…]

We’ve come a long way

Maybe you’ve seen the cartoon on somebody’s office door or wall. A large bird is trying to swallow a small frog. Half of the frog’s body is dangling from the bird’s beak. The frog’s arms are outstretched as far as possible, and it’s making a determined effort to choke the bird. The caption, from the frog’s perspective, reads: “Don’t ever give up.”

[Read more…]

That Gronewald guy is pretty good

Each year, just prior to the NFL draft, serious people with notebooks and stopwatches gather at various venues for “Pro Days.” Ashton Gronewold was determined to impress these people with amazing vertical jumps, broad jumps and 40-yard dashes. Surely some of the scouts were paying attention…This Gronewold guy has skills…But, still, he’s just not big enough, right?

[Read more…]

Step into ΑΦΑ culture

When Lawrence George was growing up in New Orleans, he was curious about the fraternity antics of young college students in his community. “I used to see them on Canal Street sitting on blocks of ice,” George says. “And when I became a pledge, things that are now considered ‘hazing’ were accepted.”

[Read more…]

re:viewing the world

Farouk El-BazFarouk El-Baz, MS GGph’61, PhD GGph’64, used remote sensing technology to help NASA officials determine where the Eagle would land in 1969. The producers of Star Trek: The Next Generation were so impressed by his work that they named a spacecraft, The El-Baz, after him.
As director of the Center for Remote Sensing at Boston University and a member of the National Academy of Engineering, El-Baz continues to be a man on a number of missions.

[Read more…]

re:growing bones

growing bones
Human bone cells are attracted to porous medical scaffolding made out of bioactive glasses. Illustration by Jeff Harper.

Delbert Day, CerE’58, MS CerE’60, says it’s like seeding a fishing environment by throwing an old Christmas tree into the water. The submerged tree provides good pockets of cover for all kinds of fish. But this isn’t really a discussion about aquatic habitats. Day is trying to explain why human bone cells would want to colonize medical scaffolding made out of glass fibers.

[Read more…]

Reducing carbon footprints

The housing market may be soft, but one neighborhood in Rolla is seeing a building boom. Okay, so it’s really just a little village on campus property with a current population of two. But this is a village of the future, and the site developers are thinking long-term.

[Read more…]

A century of St. Pats

The more things change, the more they stay the Best Ever.

St. Patrick lived roughly 1,600 years ago and historians will tell you he wasn’t really Irish – he was probably Welsh. Legend has it that he was kidnapped as a teenager by pirates and taken to Ireland, where he was enslaved. He escaped and eventually became the patron saint of Ireland. (After becoming a Bishop, he went back to Ireland and ultimately died there.) He was never an engineer and there haven’t been snakes in Ireland since before the last ice age.

[Read more…]