In the land Down Under

The Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw once described England and America as “two countries separated by a common language.” Karen Bard, PetE’81, thinks Shaw’s saying also holds true for America and her current home, Australia.

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The ultimate dream job: For some S&T grads, space really is the final frontier

In February, Sandra Magnus became the first person to study fire aboard the International Space Station.

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Greek mythology

Elliot Gross
Photo by B.A. Rupert

With 23 members, Beta Sigma Psi was one of Missouri S&T’s smaller fraternities when Elliot Gross (pictured at right) joined the chapter in 2005. Just a year earlier, the fraternity had dwindled to a small band of 11 brothers, far below the “70 or 80” members Beta Sig boasted in the early ‘80s, Gross says.
By 2008, Beta Sig’s membership had grown to 46. Based on early recruitment numbers, Gross, who is now president of Beta Sig, expects at least a dozen new members in the fall.

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Go ask Alice? We would if we could

For more than four decades, students chosen to become knights of St. Patrick underwent a baptism into a pool of soupy, slimy concoction that came to be known as “Alice.”

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Fitz: St. Pat’s man behind the lens

Bob Fitzsimmons was a high school freshman when he started working part time for the Rolla Daily News in 1956.

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Ben Roodman: Text is what’s next

To glimpse the future of social networking, don’t look to MySpace or Facebook. Turn on your cell phone instead. That’s the platform Ben Roodman is using to help on-the-go hipsters gather the latest information about concerts, movies and other forms of entertainment in their communities.
Roodman, who graduates this May with a bachelor’s degree in computer engineering, is the CEO of ImThere, a social networking service that connects subscribers to information about events – such as concerts, CD launch parties or indie film festivals – via text messages over their cell phones.

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Taking us to the top 5

View imageThe plan called for increasing fundraising, research and student recruitment efforts to help attain the goal. At the same time, Carney wanted to reduce the university’s deficit and flatten the administration to break down “silos” among the academic departments – moves that were also necessary to ensure the campus operates at peak efficiency.

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Rankings bolster reputation

If there were ever any doubts about UMR’s standing as a top technological research university, two major rankings during the past year should have put those doubts to rest.
First, UMR was named one of the nation’s 25 “most connected” campuses in a survey conducted by Forbes and The Princeton Review. That report, posted on the Forbes.com website last January, identified UMR among the universities “closest to the cutting edge” of technological innovation.
Last June, UMR made CIO magazine’s 2006 “CIO 100” list for its unified web presence. The annual list highlights businesses, universities and other organizations the magazine sees as the most tech-innovative.
All of this is happening in one of the nation’s best small towns, according to a recent report from BizJournals.com. Rolla is 13th on the BizJournal list of “America’s Dream Towns,” and second in the Midwest region.

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Time for a new name?

For 42 years, this campus has been known as the University of Missouri-Rolla, or UMR. But does that name really reflect the university’s true identity?
That’s one of the questions UMR alumni, students, faculty and staff are pondering as the university community considers the possibility of changing the campus’s name.
During his “State of the University” address on Oct. 9, Chancellor John F. Carney III called upon students, faculty and staff to enter into a discussion about the university’s name. He’s also seeking feedback from alumni.

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It’s a flat, flat, flat, flat world

It was “a time of tremendous excitement” for engineers when Harry J. “Hank” Sauer Jr. entered graduate school at MSM-UMR 50 years ago. It had been nine years since Chuck Yeager had broken the sound barrier, and the U.S. seemed poised for even greater breakthroughs in flight. Fueled by the post-World War II economy and federal funding for research, MSM-UMR’s graduate programs were also poised for takeoff.
But a year later – as Sauer, ME’56, MS ME’58, joined the mechanical engineering faculty while continuing his graduate studies part time – something happened that further accelerated the research activities at MSM-UMR and other universities throughout the nation. That something was the Soviet Union’s launch of the world’s first satellite, a basketball-sized sphere known as Sputnik I.

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