Archives for July 2018

Sunshine (and wind and geothermal) in Silicon Valley

At Missouri S&T, Jay Modi, MBA’10, combined his interest in business and enterprise resource planning to become one of the university’s first MBA graduates. [Read more…]

A legacy in mining

For the Rychtarczyks, engineering is a family affair spanning centuries and oceans. [Read more…]

Nanodiamonds are this researcher’s best friend

Recent chemistry graduate Cholaphan Deeleepojananan, Chem’18, studies microscopic bling known as nanodiamonds — carbon-based particles that are about 5-billionths of a meter — because she says their potential future applications are unlimited. [Read more…]

A new look for Miner athletics

This fall, Miner athletics fans will begin to see a refreshed visual identity as S&T’s 17 varsity teams transition to an updated set of design elements. They include an updated athletic logo, typography and spirit marks like those pictured above, displayed by student-athletes at a campus reveal. [Read more…]

Miners just want to have fun

One chapter of the S&T sesquicentennial history book will focus on pranks and scandals. As part of his research for that chapter, Larry Gragg, Curators’ Distinguished Teaching Professor emeritus of history and political science, asked you to share your stories. Here are just a couple of them.

My freshman year, several of my dorm friends and I had a water balloon fight outside our RA’s room.

She only came out to tell us to stop when she heard one explode on her door. Oh yeah, the balloons were water‑filled condoms. A year or two later, my roommates and I got really into interior decoration using items found around campus. Some of these items included “wet floor” signs from various buildings, traffic cones with Missouri S&T painted on them and orange construction fence. Prior to graduating, I returned all items except for a hot pink wet floor sign with a mustache painted on it that was taken from the electrical engineering building.

Becky Robinson, IST’16, Blue Springs, Mo.


One Halloween about 1982, some students of Del Day in the MRC (Materials Research Center) decided to honor his role in making specialty glasses in the space shuttle missions. So Heidi Rutz, CerE’85, MS CerE’88, donated her white Honda Civic coupe and the ‘crew’ set out to convert it to a shuttle craft to fly through Rolla and trick-or-treat (heavy on the treat) at the Days’ home. Heidi, Glenn Whichard, MS CerE’83, and I fabricated wings and a rudder with white cardboard and 2x4s. The propulsion unit was three metal ash tray cylinders taped together with a CO2 fire extinguisher in one, mounted out the back of the hatch. Top speed was 35 mph before the whole thing became unstable. Still searching for that photo. Never heard from safety about the empty fire extinguisher! Was there even a safety department back then?

Tom Wetteroth, CerE’79, MS CerE’83, Chandler, Ariz.

Record 31 athletes earn GLVC honors

Thirty-one Missouri S&T student-athletes recorded a 4.0 grade point average during the 2017–18 academic year — the highest number recorded in a single year in S&T history. [Read more…]

S&T team places second in University Rover Challenge, best among U.S. teams

Missouri S&T’s Mars Rover Design Team, winner of the 2017 University Rover Challenge (URC), finished second among a field of 36 collegiate teams in this year’s competition, which was won by Poland’s Czestochowa University of Technology. S&T had the top score among the 12 U.S. teams in the competition. [Read more…]

S&T collaborates with MU, UMKC on drone research

Missouri S&T’s expertise in electrical and computer engineering will play a role in a new $7.2 million grant and a $7.7 million contract from the U.S. Department of Defense’s Office of Naval Research to reduce national security threats from drones. The project is led by the University of Missouri-Kansas City and includes researchers from the University of Missouri-Columbia. [Read more…]

Studying the human side of medicine

Recent studies suggest that the more medical students were exposed to courses in the humanities, the more likely they were to possess empathy, wisdom and emotional intelligence. Because scientists and humanists often learn and work differently, the field of biomedical humanities examines the human side of healthcare through disciplines like literature, history and philosophy. [Read more…]

In your words

One of the highlights from this weekend: Young woman during the Q&A portion of my talk: “I don’t have a question. Just wanted to let you know I want to be an engineer and have just decided to go to @MissouriSandT because of your talk.”

Stephanie Evans, AE’12, an electrical test engineer at Space Systems Loral in Palo Alto, Calif., and creator of The STEMulus YouTube channel, spoke to a group of high school students in Illinois about making STEM more welcoming. The comment Evans tweeted came during the Q&A portion.

“So heads up, fellow Miners. You’ve got a new recruit incoming, and I’m confident she’s going to continue the Missouri S&T tradition of shaping STEM fields, not just with innovation, but also with inclusion,” wrote Evans about the experience. Read her complete essay at magazine.mst.edu.

– Steph Evz @StephEvz43


Thank you for being there as a fellow member and advisor. You have helped keep KMNR fantastic (and yes, weird), and we struggle to think of a better person to be our advisor. For those moments when we struggle, you are there to lend a judgement-free ear and practical guidance. Your advice and opinions carry weight with us, and we take them to heart. We respect you and we will always be there to return the favor. Dr. Schramm, you have done so much for us and for KMNR that we want to give back. Please accept this gift, obtained through donations from DJs past and present, as a token of our appreciation. We hope you enjoy it, and we hope you realize how much appreciation we hold for you and the impact you have made on all of us. Read the full letter.

My students bought me a hydraulic wood splitter.

Since I arrived here at S&T, I’ve been the faculty advisor for KMNR, 89.7 FM, the student-run college radio station. The students are kind enough to allow me to do a one-hour radio show most Wednesday mornings 10–11 a.m. As the advisor to a great bunch of students, I do what I always try to do, treat people with kindness, respect and love. I didn’t think I was doing anything special. But the students and alumni of KMNR evidently thought otherwise. They organized, unbeknownst to me, a fundraising effort to buy me a gift to show just how much they appreciated my advice over the years. They raised more than enough to purchase this wood splitter! They presented it to me after my radio show last week. For one of a very few moments of my life, I was actually speechless. It’s taken me several days to even put my thoughts together here. They composed a nice letter to go along with the splitter. It will soon be framed and on my wall in a place of honor.

As a professor, I teach a great many students, both inside and outside of the classroom. They spend their time here at S&T, then move off into the world and live their lives. We professors may keep in touch with a few, but we never really know how they are doing and if all our time, energy, effort and passion in our teaching and interactions with students makes any real difference. But today I know that, perhaps, just a little, I did. I am honored and humbled beyond words.

– Jeff Schramm, Hist’92, associate professor of history and political science