Making ‘smart’ decisions

By studying a combination of physical actions, social behavior analysis and data analytics, Missouri S&T researchers hope to better understand how people make decisions when interacting with technology in “smart” environments.

S.N. Balakrishnan, Curators’ Distinguished Professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, and Devin Burns, assistant professor of psychological science, say the outcomes of the study could be applied to consumer energy use, purchasing behavior, governmental regulations and even medical diagnoses.

“Studies have shown that when people are presented with two pieces of information, their decisions show differences depending on which piece is presented first,” says Burns. “We are hoping to move a step beyond describing these cognitive quirks and will test if simple behavioral interventions can help decision makers avoid being unduly influenced by the chance timing of information.”

Using decision-making situations capable of producing results that consider the “smart” environment they are made in, the researchers hope to gather data about how individuals made their choices.

Around the Puck

Pushing the boundaries of space exploration

Space tourism could start in the next  two years, says Jeff Thornburg, AE’96, but it’s going to be expensive.

[Read More...]

EWB completes Guatemala project

After nearly a decade of work, a small Guatemalan village can now count on clean drinking water thanks to the Missouri S&T student chapter of Engineers Without Borders (EWB).

[Read More...]

Homecoming 2017

The Miner Alumni Association honored a select group of alumni during Homecoming for their accomplishments and their devotion to the association, the campus and its students.

[Read More...]

Dissolving electronics

Electronic devices that can not only be implanted in the human body but also completely dissolve on their own — known as “bioresorbable” electronics — are one of medical technology’s next frontiers.

[Read More...]

Automated kiosk speeds travel security

Your wait time at the airport could drop significantly thanks to a new automated security kiosk developed by Nathan Twyman, assistant professor of business and information technology.

[Read More...]

Speak Your Mind

*