Katie Payne — future M.D.

The daughter of a logger and a school teacher, Katie Payne, BSci’14, knew she wanted to make a big impact on the world, but it took an anatomy class at Cuba (Mo.) High School to guide her decision to go into medicine.

“When I started telling people I wanted to be a doctor, because I come from a small town with no family background in healthcare, their first reaction was to tell me how unpractical this was,” Payne says.

Her choice to attend Missouri S&T started out as an economical one, but when she saw how caring the faculty were, and started on her first research project, she knew she was in the right place.

“I have been very fortunate with research opportunities in college,” says Payne, who worked as a research assistant for Rolla dermatologist Dr. William V. Stoecker. “The job allowed me to collect data directly from patients and analyze it.”

Payne graduated with eight research publications on her resume. Her favorite, which was published in the November 2014 Journal of the American Medical Association Dermatology, examined the way pain is transmitted in a patient with a brown recluse spider bite.

Now in her third year of medical school at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, Payne is still conducting research. She works with a neurologist and headache specialist at Children’s Mercy in Kansas City to use trigeminal nerve stimulation to treat chronic migraines in kids.

“Medical school is challenging but very rewarding,” Payne says. “I spend most of my time trying to find a good balance between work and play, which I think is common to most careers.”

Payne plans to graduate in May 2019 and begin her residency that June. This past March, she started clinical rotations at Truman Medical Center, a safety-net hospital in Kansas City. She was thrilled to get out of the classroom.

“Working with patients at Truman Medical Center is a humbling experience,” she says. “It really adds a new perspective to medicine.”

“Medical school is challenging but very rewarding.”

Around the Puck

Google electromagnetic interference

A decade from now, your smartphone won’t look anything like it does today — at least on the inside.

[Read More...]

Lecture series brings chemistry grads full circle

James O. Stoffer wanted to give Missouri S&T students a chance to learn from eminent scholars and innovators in polymer chemistry and related areas. So last fall the Curators’ Distinguished Professor emeritus of chemistry established a lecture series to showcase his former students and inspire current ones.

[Read More...]

Fueling space flight

It started with a boyhood dream of becoming an astronaut fueled from watching the 1995 Hollywood portrayal of the ill‑fated Apollo 13 lunar mission.

[Read More...]

Record gift for EWB

From clean drinking water to flood control, Missouri S&T students participating in Engineers Without Borders (EWB) are changing lives in Central and South America.

[Read More...]

Million-dollar gift supports scholarships

Steve Wunning, ME’73, has established a $1 million scholarship endowment at Missouri S&T: the Steven H. and Lyneve C. Wunning Scholarship Fund.

[Read More...]