Studying blood for the greater good

Elizabeth Bowles wants to eliminate drug side effects in patients with conditions like diabetes or cystic fibrosis.

Graduate student Elizabeth Bowles works in Schrenk Hall for research related to red blood cells on Tuesday March 15, 2016. Sam O'Keefe/Missouri S&T

Graduate student Elizabeth Bowles works in Schrenk Hall for research related to red blood cells on Tuesday March 15, 2016. Sam O’Keefe/Missouri S&T

She’s working with Phelps County Regional Medical Center in Rolla to test blood samples from willing patients to see what effect the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has on blood vessel dilation. She also wants to see if ATP levels tie in with different medical conditions.

ATP is the chemical energy within cells that powers metabolism. Patients with diabetes, hypertension, cystic fibrosis and a host of other conditions have reduced ATP release.

“We are looking to improve ATP release and correct some of the adverse effects of the condition patients have,” Bowles says.

Bowles says FDA-approved drugs that stimulate ATP release exist, but they are known to have severe adverse side effects. She hopes to help reduce the problem of side effects with a new drug-delivery system.

“If you package the drug in a liposome — a spherical vesicle — you can deliver the drug directly to the red blood cell and stimulate ATP release without causing other side effects,” Bowles says. “The liposomes are FDA-approved, but not for this use.”

Bowles says her goal is to correct both the problem of reduced ATP release and the adverse side effects with this one new approach.

Around the Puck

Pushing the boundaries of space exploration

Space tourism could start in the next  two years, says Jeff Thornburg, AE’96, but it’s going to be expensive.

[Read More...]

EWB completes Guatemala project

After nearly a decade of work, a small Guatemalan village can now count on clean drinking water thanks to the Missouri S&T student chapter of Engineers Without Borders (EWB).

[Read More...]

Homecoming 2017

The Miner Alumni Association honored a select group of alumni during Homecoming for their accomplishments and their devotion to the association, the campus and its students.

[Read More...]

Dissolving electronics

Electronic devices that can not only be implanted in the human body but also completely dissolve on their own — known as “bioresorbable” electronics — are one of medical technology’s next frontiers.

[Read More...]

Automated kiosk speeds travel security

Your wait time at the airport could drop significantly thanks to a new automated security kiosk developed by Nathan Twyman, assistant professor of business and information technology.

[Read More...]