NASA career rewarding for Leucht

Kurt W. Leucht, EE’94, has been working at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Merritt Island, Fla., for 25 years and has been writing software for large and small projects ever since.

One project is research and development of in-situ resource utilization, or ISRU, which means living off the land while exploring another planetary body. It could mean planting potatoes on Mars or extracting hydrogen and oxygen molecules from Martian soil. Leucht developed monitoring and control software for the project.

“ISRU is hot in the news right now,” he says. “And robotics are always hot in the news, it seems.”

He’s also the principal investigator on a project that created a swarm of small, lightweight, inexpensive mobile robots, called Swarmies, that are programed to behave like ants to seek and collect resources in an unknown environment.

And he’s the lead software engineer for a robotic excavator, the regolith advanced surface systems operations robot, or RASSOR.

Around the Puck

A new department for teaching

This past fall, the popularity of Missouri S&T’s STEM-focused teacher education program led to the establishment of an official academic department, called teacher education and certification.

[Read More...]

Claire Brewer: tuned in to healthcare

Claire Brewer, BSci’17, knew she wanted to become a doctor when she entered Missouri S&T.

[Read More...]

The power of influence

This past December, in addition to the traditional alumni commencement speaker, four graduating seniors addressed their fellow graduates.

[Read More...]

Assignment: Design a new animal shelter

Students in the architectural engineering design course spent the fall semester creating 15 potential designs for a new animal shelter in Rolla and presented six of them to the Rolla City Council in December. Two of the finalists are pictured above.

[Read More...]

“Alex’s Pizza, of course!”

We asked about your favorite place to eat, and boy did you respond. It was such an overwhelming response that Larry Gragg, author of Missouri S&T’s sesquicentennial history book, was inspired to write about it.

[Read More...]