Clearing the air

biofuels

Using equipment that captures and measures exhaust, the researchers tested biofuels in the same type of engine used by a Boeing 737.

Mixing alternative fuels with conventional jet fuel can cut aircraft emissions by nearly 40 percent, says Prem Lobo, MS ChE’03, MS EMgt’05. And it doesn’t affect engine performance.

In a study published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, Lobo and his fellow Missouri S&T researchers tested two types of alternative jet fuels: biofuels made from vegetable oils, and fuels made with the Fischer-Tropsch process, which creates liquid hydrocarbons from coal, natural gas or biomass. Using equipment that captures and measures exhaust, the researchers tested the fuels in the same type of engine used by a Boeing 737, measuring at different power levels to simulate an airplane’s taxi, takeoff, climb and descent.
They found that the more alternative fuel they blended with the jet fuel, the lower the particulate matter emissions. But they also discovered that the only fuel that was a viable alternative was a 50-50 blend of Fischer-Tropsch fuel and jet fuel. It maintained adequate engine power for commercial or military use and it reduced particulate matter mass emissions by 39 percent.
Lobo, assistant director of the S&T Center of Excellence for Aerospace Particulate Emissions Reduction Research, was the lead author of the Environmental Science and Technology paper. Co-authors were Philip Whitefield, interim vice provost for academic affairs, professor of chemistry and director of the center, and Donald Hagen, professor of physics and a researcher at the center.

Around the Puck

Pushing the boundaries of space exploration

Space tourism could start in the next  two years, says Jeff Thornburg, AE’96, but it’s going to be expensive.

[Read More...]

EWB completes Guatemala project

After nearly a decade of work, a small Guatemalan village can now count on clean drinking water thanks to the Missouri S&T student chapter of Engineers Without Borders (EWB).

[Read More...]

Homecoming 2017

The Miner Alumni Association honored a select group of alumni during Homecoming for their accomplishments and their devotion to the association, the campus and its students.

[Read More...]

Dissolving electronics

Electronic devices that can not only be implanted in the human body but also completely dissolve on their own — known as “bioresorbable” electronics — are one of medical technology’s next frontiers.

[Read More...]

Automated kiosk speeds travel security

Your wait time at the airport could drop significantly thanks to a new automated security kiosk developed by Nathan Twyman, assistant professor of business and information technology.

[Read More...]