On the horizon

Thanks to the generosity of 22,000 alumni and friends, Missouri S&T’s future has never looked brighter. Nearly 20 percent of alumni – double the national average of 10 percent – contribute each year, supporting one of the nation’s broadest arrays of engineering disciplines.


“It is gratifying to know that the more than 50,000 living alumni of Missouri S&T have, in general, been extremely successful in their life pursuits,” says Chancellor John F. Carney III. “They recognize that this success is due in large part to the education they received in Rolla. Their continuing generosity reflects this realization, and we are very grateful for this support.”

As Miners have answered the call, the Miner Alumni Association has stepped forward too with plans to build a house for visiting alumni to call home. If all goes as scheduled, Miners of all ages will be able to relax together in a beautiful new home right in the heart of Rolla, just in time for Homecoming 2012. The house is named in honor of the late Karl, MinE’25, and Marjorie Hasselmann.

“This house is for all MSM, UMR and S&T alumni, regardless of their majors and where they lived on campus.”

“This house is for all MSM, UMR and S&T alumni, regardless of their majors and where they lived on campus,” says Marianne Ward, director of alumni and constituent relations. “Every year our activities grow in number and in attendance, and the Hasselmann Alumni House will accommodate everyone returning to campus.”
Although the design is not yet finalized, there will be a large outdoor area to host events like Homecoming and St. Pat’s, says Ward. One of the two gardens, named for Fred, CE’55, and June Kummer, will include plantings of a variation of daylily named for June Kummer.
Ward says naming opportunities remain in the house for donations ranging from $5,000-$500,000.
“We are thrilled the Miner Alumni Association voted to build this house,” says Ward. “It will forever change our alumni relations.”
Seven other capital projects are under way on the Missouri S&T campus, including the federally funded renovation of Straumanis-James Hall (which houses the Graduate Center for Materials Research); and construction of the Kummer Student Design Center and the Miner Dome Indoor Practice Facility, both funded through alumni gifts; and Innovation Park, S&T’s research park, which is funded in part by private companies interested in partnering with the university.
Thanks to the generosity of 22,000 alumni and friends, Missouri S&T’s future has never looked brighter. Nearly 20 percent of alumni — double the national average of 10 percent — contribute each year, supporting one of the nation’s broadest arrays of engineering disciplines.

Around the Puck

Generous partners complete ACML fundraising

Thanks to an investment from the University of Missouri System, major gifts from industry partners and alumni support, S&T will break ground on the Advanced Construction and Materials Laboratory (ACML) on Oct. 12, during Homecoming weekend.

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Alumni help with sesquicentennial planning

Seven alumni, including three Miner Alumni Association board members, have been named to Missouri S&T’s sesquicentennial advisory committee. The group is made up of graduates, students, faculty, staff and community members who are involved in planning the university’s upcoming 150th anniversary celebration.

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Using big data to reduce childbirth risks

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, complications during pregnancy or childbirth affect more than 50,000 women annually, and about 700 of them die every year. Steve Corns, associate professor of engineering management and systems engineering, is working with researchers from Phelps County Regional Medical Center through the Ozarks Biomedical Initiative to reduce […]

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Bogan solves Benton mural mystery

Missouri State Capitol muralist Thomas Hart Benton wrote in his memoir about being called into then-Gov. Guy Park’s office and told that a prominent St. Louis politician objected to Benton’s portrayal of black people, especially depictions of slavery.

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Breaking bias

According to Jessica Cundiff, assistant professor of psychological science at S&T, women who consider careers in the physical sciences, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields are deterred by stereotypes that impose barriers on the recruitment, retention and advancement of women in STEM.

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