With a (lotta) help … from our friends

It takes many hands to make light work and to create a community of support for S&T students and alumni. Without the help of volunteers, mailings wouldn’t be as prompt; events wouldn’t run as smoothly (there’d also be no one to show visitors the way to the facilities at commencement). These individuals enrich the university experience for students and staff. It really couldn’t be done without them. The following standouts spend many hours helping the association, bringing along a wealth of knowledge and experience:

Left to right: Dixie Finley, Nancy and Don Brackhahn, Chuck Remington and Charlie Hell. (Photo by B.A. Rupert)

  • Chuck Remington, ME’49, MS ME’50, retired in 1989 as a longtime mechanical engineering professor at S&T. He and his late wife, Agnes, began volunteering shortly after his retirement. Remington enjoys livening up the typically quiet office, especially on Tuesdays when he just might bring brownies from the “pie lady” at the farmer’s market. His is a familiar face, and voice, to many. Elaine Russell, external relations manager, tells of a recent campus visit by an alumnus and his family. “Jeff Buck, ME’77, was here from Houston and he recognized his former professor, Chuck, by his voice,” she says. “Everyone seems to know him.”
  • Charlie Hell, a volunteer for more than 11 years, is the son of the late John “Pat” Hell, MinE’33. He left his hometown of Rolla to work at AT&T in St. Louis, then retired to Florida. Hell returned to Rolla after 45 years and says former high school classmate, John Smith, CE’51, got him involved with the alumni office. Remington and Hell are popular with the students. At the senior pizza party, Stacy Jones, internal relations manager, often hears from students “those older guys at the registration table are so much fun.”
  • Dixie Finley, Psyc’68, widow of Charles B. Finley, former head football coach at S&T, is the newest alumni office volunteer. She retired after 25 years as a counselor for Rolla schools and now enjoys working with the alumni staff and volunteers. “The people are friendly, helpful, gracious and very appreciative,” she says.
  • Don and Nancy Brackhahn volunteer around campus and the community. Don retired in 2002 after 17 years as director of alumni affairs and constituent relations at S&T. “We’ve developed great friendships with alumni here over the years,” says Don. “We want to give back some of what we’ve received from the university and the community.” The Brackhahns attend Homecoming and other events, and as many Miner sporting events as they can. Nancy served as president of the Miner Booster Club for six years and continues as a member of its board. “It helps us keep in touch with alums and friends,” she says.

Around the Puck

Generous partners complete ACML fundraising

Thanks to an investment from the University of Missouri System, major gifts from industry partners and alumni support, S&T will break ground on the Advanced Construction and Materials Laboratory (ACML) on Oct. 12, during Homecoming weekend.

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Alumni help with sesquicentennial planning

Seven alumni, including three Miner Alumni Association board members, have been named to Missouri S&T’s sesquicentennial advisory committee. The group is made up of graduates, students, faculty, staff and community members who are involved in planning the university’s upcoming 150th anniversary celebration.

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Using big data to reduce childbirth risks

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, complications during pregnancy or childbirth affect more than 50,000 women annually, and about 700 of them die every year. Steve Corns, associate professor of engineering management and systems engineering, is working with researchers from Phelps County Regional Medical Center through the Ozarks Biomedical Initiative to reduce […]

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Bogan solves Benton mural mystery

Missouri State Capitol muralist Thomas Hart Benton wrote in his memoir about being called into then-Gov. Guy Park’s office and told that a prominent St. Louis politician objected to Benton’s portrayal of black people, especially depictions of slavery.

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Breaking bias

According to Jessica Cundiff, assistant professor of psychological science at S&T, women who consider careers in the physical sciences, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields are deterred by stereotypes that impose barriers on the recruitment, retention and advancement of women in STEM.

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