What we don’t know about liquefaction could hurt us

In one corner of a huge civil engineering laboratory on campus, Ronaldo Luna watches a machine shake silt from the Mississippi River until it liquefies.

“This is what would happen during a major earthquake along the Mississippi River,” says Luna, an associate professor of civil, architectural and environmental engineering at Missouri S&T.

Martin Luther King Memorial Bridge

The Martin Luther King Memorial Bridge crosses the Mississippi River in St. Louis. Photo by Jan Kronsell

Researchers don’t fully understand the liquefaction process for silts (they have a better understanding of how it works with sands), but Luna is confident, based on his tests, that a 6.5 magnitude earthquake or bigger would cause solid surfaces along the banks of the Mississippi River to turn, momentarily, into liquid.

This would be very bad. For instance, liquefaction of river silts would cause bridges to fail in St. Louis during a big earthquake.

Last spring, Luna presented a paper, “Liquefaction Behavior of Mississippi River Silts,” at the Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics Conference in Sacramento, Calif. The conference is only held once every 10 years.

“We are providing data points to what is already known about liquefaction in other areas,” Luna says.

Scientists have studied what happens during and immediately after a major earthquake in well-shook places like California. But the last really big quakes in the Midwest occurred in 1812.

Differences in geography cause major quakes in the Midwest to be felt over a greater area than similar-sized quakes in California.

According to Luna, river silts in the New Madrid region are similar to those in earthquake-prone areas of China and India.

Last May, a devastating 7.9 earthquake caused extensive damage throughout the Sichuan province in the interior of China.

Around the Puck

By the numbers: Fall/Winter 2018

8,607 Students enrolled for the fall semester at Missouri S&T. Classes started Aug. 20. 91 Percentage of first-year freshmen who receive scholarships and financial aid.

[Read More...]

Making tornado alley safer

Growing up in northeast China, Guirong “Grace” Yan didn’t see many tornados in a country where the number of documented twisters is a fraction of those that hit the United States. But as her academic career took Yan to several postdoctoral fellowships and then faculty positions in Indiana, Missouri and Texas, the assistant professor of […]

[Read More...]

Living laboratory houses lead battery research

This past November, Missouri S&T installed two new advanced lead battery microgrid systems at the EcoVillage, a “living laboratory” that is home to S&T’s solar-powered homes.

[Read More...]

Partners for progress

An expansion of the partnership between Missouri S&T and Missouri State University will allow students to pursue a mechanical engineering degree on the Missouri State campus with courses taught by faculty from both institutions. Students began applying this fall. The program will begin in fall 2019.

[Read More...]

Chancellor search is underway

This past August, University of Missouri President Mun Choi announced the formation of a 23-member committee to lead a nationwide search for a chancellor at Missouri S&T.

[Read More...]